tie rendering

It seems like I can’t resist the gravity of the vast ↵moc- and afol-scene. And thick participation means, among other things, sharing practices. So I followed the comprehensive tutorial ↑Converting LDR Files to POV Files for Rendering by Jeroen de Haan and Jake McKee and then ran my rendition of a ↑TIE Interceptor (which I built first in the flesh, and then with the ↑LDraw-based ↑MLCad) through ↑POVRay. All that reminded me very much of ye olde days of game modding. Here’s how my model (every single part of it stems from the 1970s!) looks in meatspace:  … Continue reading

Share

consuming androids

At ↑Best of Behind-the-Scenes I just stumbled over the above still of German actress Brigitte Helm (1906/08-1996) on the set of ‘Metropolis’ (Lang 1927). Obviously it was quite hot inside the costume of the Maschinenmensch, which rendered the actress more or less helpless. Half a century later British actor Anthony Daniels suffered similar hardships as ↑C3P-O on the set of ‘Star Wars’ (Lucas 1977), as the following stills show, which I collected from somewhere on the Net ages ago:  It may or may not be that the designs of Lord Vader and C3P-O were inspired by ↵vintage firefighters’ equipment, but … Continue reading

Share

guy headroom

The screenshot above I grabbed from ‘↑A Message from Anonymous—12/16/2010‘ on YouTube. No, I won’t really comment on ↑Anonymous for now—my esteemed colleague ↑Biella Coleman already covers it nicely from an anthropological vantage point: ‘↑Anonymous: From the Lulz to Collective Action.’ What I am driving at are the remix-æsthetics of the video, and the sources it draws on, which stem from 1980s British cyberpunk.     The ↑Guy Fawkes mask is part of Anonymous’ corporate identity from the beginning on. Of course they had the idea from a motion picture produced by the ↑Wachowski brothers of ↑Matrix-fame: ‘V for Vendetta’ … Continue reading

Share

neuromancer tattoo

In a way this is a kind of follow-up to ↵moore’s magic. Somewhen [yes, that’s a word—still] during 2007 and 2008 ↑Nigel Palmer of Brighton has tattooed portions of text from William Gibson’s ‘Neuromancer’ (1984) on ↑the_dan’s arms. The association with Peter Greenaway’s ‘The pillow book’ (1996) is obvious. GREENAWAY, PETER. 1996. The pillow book [motion picture]. Rotterdam: Kasander & Wigman Productions. GIBSON, WILLIAM FORD. 1984. Neuromancer. New York: Penguin. via email from CT—tnx! … Continue reading

Share

larry cuba

Just dug that one up from my bookmarks—back in the 1970s ↑Larry Cuba, then at the ↑Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL), made the computer graphics seen during the endbattle against the Deathstar in the original ‘Star Wars’ (Lucas 1977).     When I first saw those animated 3D line-graphics in the cinema in ’77 I was fascinated.     Three years later, at the first computer-christmas, I got a ↑Commodore 64 (C64).     With a freely programmable computer at my hands I set out to recreate those graphics. For a start I was content with the idea of an anmation … Continue reading

Share

tripods

Polish illustrator and graphics designer Robert ‘TroC‘ Czarnyr (his website is a treasure trove for everybody seriously interested in 3D-visualization) has done two illustrations for H. G. Wells’ classic ‘The War of the Worlds’ (1898), which to my eye perfectly catch the atmosphere and ambience of the original text. You can judge for yourself, as the high resolution versions at Renderosity are accompanied with the matching excerpts from the novel: Thunder Child attacking Martian tripod war machines [Hi-Res] and Martian tripod war machines attacking London [Hi-Res]. WELLS, HERBERT GEORGE. 1898. The War of the Worlds. London: William Heinemann. via entry … Continue reading

Share

gamic

Believe it or not—there is not yet an entry for it at Wikipedia: ↑gamic [pronounced. game-ick] is a combination of the words ‘game’ and ‘comic’, meaning a graphic novel based on screenshots made ‘inside’ a computergame. Gamic is the ‘still-side’ of ↑machinima. One could say that gamic has the same relation to machinima as graphic novels have to animated cartoons. As gamic and machinima are no formally defined genre-concepts, but contemporary ‘native cyberculture concepts’ the boundaries are bleeding. Sometimes gamics are seen as a sub-genre of machinima, and there are true borderline cases ↵like the MP2-based “↑The White Room“, to … Continue reading

Share

dart plane

Remember Gaff (Edward James Olmos) continuously leaving behind tiny origami artefacts, thereby more or less cryptically commenting situations in “↑Blade Runner“? The ↑famous unicorn in particular? Well, during the Christmas days I unearthed a book I 15 years ago ordered from Dover Publications: Gery Hsu’s 1992 “How to make origami airplanes that fly.” The inside of my copy is littered with quarter- and half-finished specimen. Obviously I tried out a lot of models, but always had to give up and abandon the projects—with the exception of the very first model in the book, the “Space Shuttle” (pp. 12-15)—glides greatly! With … Continue reading

Share

reptiles

Once upon a time, when I was a kid, as a present I received a thick catalogue of the works of ↑M. C. Escher—since back then ↵I am hooked. In ↑reply to my telling Weird Tales—see also ↵visual phenomena—, today I received a nice e-mail which rubbed my nose upon one of Escher’s famous lithographs: “↑Reptilien“ (1943). Again wondering at the picture I cherish since decades, suddenly it came to my mind: It’s the perfect metaphor for my cyberanthropological research-project “↵maxmod“. A twodimensional representation of the li’l beasts crawling out of 2D-space, ↵into 3D-space, and back again … meaning those … Continue reading

Share

artform

Gaming is the most vital artform of the age, a field that has burgeoned from virtually nothing to one of the world’s most popular forms in no time flat, a field that has seen and continues to see an enormous ferment of creativity, a field that may well become the predominant artform of the 21st century, as film was of the 20th, as the novel was of the 19th. By God, we’re privileged to be here at the birth of this great form, of the creation of a democratic artform for a democratic age, the creation of structures of desire, … Continue reading

Share