gamic

Believe it or not—there is not yet an entry for it at Wikipedia: ↑gamic [pronounced. game-ick] is a combination of the words ‘game’ and ‘comic’, meaning a graphic novel based on screenshots made ‘inside’ a computergame. Gamic is the ‘still-side’ of ↑machinima. One could say that gamic has the same relation to machinima as graphic novels have to animated cartoons. As gamic and machinima are no formally defined genre-concepts, but contemporary ‘native cyberculture concepts’ the boundaries are bleeding. Sometimes gamics are seen as a sub-genre of machinima, and there are true borderline cases ↵like the MP2-based “↑The White Room“, to … Continue reading

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mana’o

The ↑Mana’o Project is “an experimental open access anthropology repository.” It is just some months old, but there already are items as far back as 1891, including some classics. Of course the frequency of items gets bigger and bigger as you get closer to the present day. Additionally the topics are tell-tale in some respect, too. Below I listed what generated a search according to my current focus of interest. Alas, it would be premature to deduce, that the things “cyber” have conquered whole anthropology, because those working on said topics of course are the first to publish their texts … Continue reading

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postigo on mods and modders

After his brilliant “From Pong to Planet Quake: Post-industrial transitions from leisure to work” (↵2003) ↑Hector Postigo has published an already promised piece plus has yet another one on the topic in the pipeline:  POSTIGO, HECTOR. 2007. Of mods and modders: Chasing down the value of fan-based digital game modifications. Games and Culture 2(4): 300-313.  This article is concerned with the role that fan-programmers (generally known as “modders”) play in the success of the PC digital game industry. The fan culture for digital games is deeply embedded in shared practices and experiences among fan communities, and their active consumption contributes … Continue reading

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stigma computer game

In my view the witchcraze against computer games and their “lethal potential” yet again is an instance of ↵virtualism, but rationality and competence indeed rise their ugly heads against it. [This entry is mainly for the German speaking readers—I beg your pardon.] The above YouTube video by Matthias Dittmayer has been uploaded two weeks ago and meanwhile has been viewed close to 230,000 times. It uncloaks a whole series of fatal errors and simply wrong facts in several television programs of the German national television channels. The central issue of those programs? “Killer games”. Long before preparing and uploading his … Continue reading

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journals on computer games and culture

“↑Eludamos: Journal for Computer Game Culture“  ELUDAMOS is an international, multi-disciplined, biannual e-journal that publishes peer-reviewed articles that theoretically and/or empirically deal with digital games in their manifold appearances and their sociocultural-historical contexts.  ELUDAMOS positions itself as a publication that fundamentally transgresses disciplinary boundaries. The aim is to join questions about and approaches to computer games from decidedly heterogeneous scientific contexts (for example cultural studies, media studies, (art) history, sociology, (social) psychology, and semiotics) and, thus, to advance the interdisciplinary discourse on digital games. This approach does not exclude questions about the distinct features of digital games a an aesthetic … Continue reading

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id tech 5

  Yesterday ↑Engine John himself appeared at Apple’s WWDC07 and for the first time presented his next generation wizardry ↑id Tech 5. Carmack showed off a short technology demonstration—allegedely handling some20GB of textures—, but didn’t say much beyond the ↑official press release:  The ground breaking technology unveiled today will power id’s new internally developed game and will be available for licensing to third parties. The new id rendering technology practically eliminates the texture memory constraints typically placed on artists and designers and allows for the unique customization of the entire game world at the pixel level, delivering virtually unlimited visual … Continue reading

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romero on consoles and more

More or less regularly my friend at Take2—who got me into all that—asks me what I am thinking about the consoles vs. personal computer issue. As someone interested in game modding and reworking, the strongest form of the appropriation of technology, I naturally always am biased towards the personal computer, because it is by far more surrounded by “interpretative flexibility” … you can do more stuff with a personal computer than with a gaming console, that means ;-) Last thursday the relaunched ↑Adrenaline Vault published an ↑interview with John Romero, and he seconds “my” conviction: “Next-gen console is big but … Continue reading

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rendered arena

↑STOCKBURGER, AXEL. 2006. “↑The rendered arena: Modalities of space in video and computer games“. London: University of the Arts. Available online [.pdf | 3.7MB]: http://www.stockburger.co.uk/research/abstract.html abstract: During the last 30 years computer and videogames have grown into a large entertainment industry of economical as well as cultural and social importance. As a distinctive field of academic inquiry begins to evolve in the form of game studies, the majority of approaches can be identified as emerging either from a background of literary theory which motivates a concentration on narrative structures or from a dedicated focus on the rules in video and … Continue reading

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