collaborative game research

A new project promising new insights into the history and development of computergames, as it focusses on the perspective of innovations:  The goal of the GIDb [↑Game Innovation Database] is to classify and record every innovation in the entire history of computer and videogames. Because we could never complete this daunting task alone, we have made the GIDb an open wiki, allowing anyone to easily add innovation entries for the benefit of everyone who cares about the history, study, and practice of game innovation. And then McKenzie Wark, author of “A Hacker Manifesto” has put the draft of his next … Continue reading

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hypergeertz

  Last term some students complained that Evans-Pritchard’s classic “Witchcraft, Oracles and Magic among the Azande” (1937) was no more to be found in our library. All the copies we held on stock apparently have been stolen. Which is a shame. Furthermore the students informed me that the German version of the book is out of print for several years already. A shame all the more. Those dreaded copyright restrictions—at least the classical texts of anthropology, indispensable for coursework, should be available online. In the case of the German version of Evans-Pritchard’s above mentioned book the situation is a little … Continue reading

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cyberpunk reading list

  Bruce Sterling’s compilation of ↑what should be in every cyberpunk library is all very well, but have a look at ↑The Cyberpunk Reading List! Now I know what I am going to do the next 1001 nights. Just some examples for you to dig, like Victor Milan’s “The Cybernetic Samurai”: “After a limited nuclear exchange, scientists in Japan work to create the first artificial consciousness. Trained in the way of Bushido—the warrior code—it unifies Japan through its influence in an effort to stop WW4.” Plus its sequel “The Cybernetic Shogun”: “The offspring of the cybernetic samurai disagree about what … Continue reading

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cyberpunk reading list

Bruce Sterling’s compilation of ↑what should be in every cyberpunk library is all very well, but have a look at ↑The Cyberpunk Reading List! Now I know what I am going to do the next 1001 nights. Just some examples for you to dig, like Victor Milan’s “The Cybernetic Samurai”: “After a limited nuclear exchange, scientists in Japan work to create the first artificial consciousness. Trained in the way of Bushido—the warrior code—it unifies Japan through its influence in an effort to stop WW4.” Plus its sequel “The Cybernetic Shogun”: “The offspring of the cybernetic samurai disagree about what role … Continue reading

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idoru going anime

  Simon from ↑CyberpunkCafe posted a ↑news item in the meatspace about this. ↑Now Playing Magazine is reporting that ↑William Gibson’s novel, Idoru [↵Gibson 1996], is going to be coming to anime. ↑Alex Steyermark, a relative unknown has been given the reigns. Apparently, there was some discussion of turning this into a live-action movie but it was cost-prohibitive. ↑Read more at cyberpunkreview. via entry at cyberpunkreview … Continue reading

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stability online

  The final draft of my paper ↑The stability of cyberspace [.pdf | 32KB], which will be published—this month, they say—in the Proceedings of the ↑Cyberspace 2005 Conference, is now online. If you’re interested, help yourself and consider the thing to be CC-licenced—same licence as this blog has. Here’s the paper’s somewhat self-aggrandizing and preposterous—blame my youthful levity—abstract:  The lack of a suitable understanding of reality experienced by human beings hampers the discourse on social and cultural phenoma triggered by information and communication technologies (ICTs). This lack generates misunderstandings which accumulate in the notion of ICT-induced realms as a Gegenwelt, … Continue reading

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lem

  Last monday, 27 March 2006, world renowned science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem died at age 84 in Krakow, his home city. When I was a teenager, every day right after school I stalked the book joint at the station just before catching the train home. Either I bought a science fiction paperback, when I had money, or I eagerly leafed through them as long as time would permit. Strange thing to me was that apparently nobody grown-up I knew thought about science fiction in positive terms, quite to the contrary. The teachers in school, who, among other things, were … Continue reading

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digital intifada, arabs, and aliens

  Just ↵as promised, my pal ↑Vít Šisler—lawyer, arabist, and anthropologist-in-disguise—now has done it and brought his fresh, new, and tremendously interesting articles online:  ↑Digital Intifada (↵Šisler 2006b) “examines political videogames produced by the Syrian company Afkar Media in Damascus, mainly their recent game Tahta al-Hisar (Under Siege) and puts them in a broader context of persuasive and serious games. It deals with the representation of the Other and Foreign in videogames, construction of the Arab and Islamic heroes and ongoing digital emancipation of the Near East.”  ↑In videogames you shoot Arabs or Aliens (↵Šisler 2006a) is an “interview with … Continue reading

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