lem

  Last monday, 27 March 2006, world renowned science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem died at age 84 in Krakow, his home city. When I was a teenager, every day right after school I stalked the book joint at the station just before catching the train home. Either I bought a science fiction paperback, when I had money, or I eagerly leafed through them as long as time would permit. Strange thing to me was that apparently nobody grown-up I knew thought about science fiction in positive terms, quite to the contrary. The teachers in school, who, among other things, were … Continue reading

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digital intifada, arabs, and aliens

  Just ↵as promised, my pal ↑Vít Šisler—lawyer, arabist, and anthropologist-in-disguise—now has done it and brought his fresh, new, and tremendously interesting articles online:  ↑Digital Intifada (↵Šisler 2006b) “examines political videogames produced by the Syrian company Afkar Media in Damascus, mainly their recent game Tahta al-Hisar (Under Siege) and puts them in a broader context of persuasive and serious games. It deals with the representation of the Other and Foreign in videogames, construction of the Arab and Islamic heroes and ongoing digital emancipation of the Near East.”  ↑In videogames you shoot Arabs or Aliens (↵Šisler 2006a) is an “interview with … Continue reading

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game modding, intermediality and participatory culture

Hell, am I backward! And—concerning everything connected to ICTs—Scandinavia has its nose way up front, as usual. ↑2R just hinted me via e-mail—tnx a lot, man—to a paper by Olli Sotamaa:  ↑SOTAMAA, OLLI. 2003. ↑Computer game modding, intermediality and participatory culture [.pdf | 146KB]. Paper presented at the PhD course ↑New Media? New Theories? New Methods? organised by: The Nordic network “Innovating Media and Communication Research”, 1-5 December 2003, The Sandbjerg Estate—Aarhus University Conference Centre.  Here are the last three paragraphs of the introduction:  My intention in this article is to analyze the forms and meanings of gamer-made designs and … Continue reading

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bibliography update

The reason for the literature spree of the recent days is my planning of the two courses ↵on computergames and online-communities I will teach during the upcoming term. In the wake of that I updated, ‘enhanced’, and reformatted my ↵online bibliography. Now it’s laid out more clearly, I guess. Prey on it—that’s why it is online. … Continue reading

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cyberanthropology—anthropology of cyberculture

↑BUDKA, PHILIPP AND ↑MANFRED KREMSER. 2004. “↑CyberAnthropology—Anthropology of CyberCulture” [.pdf | 715KB], in Contemporary issues in socio-cultural anthropology: Perspectives and research activities from Austria edited by S. Khittel, B. Plankensteiner and M. Six-Hohenbalken (eds.), pp. 213-226. Vienna: Loecker.  abstract: This article investigates the historical development, the major theories and the ethnographic domains of an anthropology of cyberculture. In doing so, the authors use Arturo Escobar’s influential paper on cyberanthropology, written in 1994, and connect potential research questions posed in this text with research projects recently conducted at the Viennese Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology. The authors conclude that the … Continue reading

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computer game research 101

↑SMITH, JONAS HEIDE. 2002. ↑Computer game research 101: A brief introduction to the literature. ↑Game Research, December 2002.  abstract: A few years ago there wasn’t much to talk about. Now, however, computer game research is booming resulting in common terminology, competing paradigms and serious discussion on the subjects of games and gaming. This article attempts to provide an introduction to the field of computer game research. … Continue reading

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co-creative media

↑MORRIS, SUE. 2004. ↑Co-creative media: Online multiplayer computer game culture. ↑Scan: Journal of media arts culture ↑1(1).  abstract: As a new and emerging research area, computer games demand the development of new theoretical frameworks for research and analysis. In addition to the specific requirements of a new medium, the advent and rapidly rising popularity of multiplayer computer gaming creates further challenges for researchers when the text under analysis forms a locus for human interaction – structuring and mediating communication between large numbers of people, and spawning social practices and identifications within a cultural economy extending beyond the game itself. While … Continue reading

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gaming at a lan event

↑JANSZ, JEROEN AND LONNEKE MARTENS. 2005. ↑Gaming at a LAN event: the social context of playing video games. [.pdf | 235KB] ↑new media & society ↑7(↑3):333-355.  abstract: An exploratory survey was undertaken about the appeal of playing video games at a Local Area Network (LAN) event where personal computers are linked in order to play both face-to-face and online. First, we wanted to know who the visitors of a LAN event were, because there is hardly any research available about this class of gamers. Second, we wanted to know why they participated in a LAN event. The survey showed that … Continue reading

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