behind closed doors

That one came timely—just two days after ↵telegeography, my rant on the other side of information technology, the Internet’s hardware aspect, and its importance for anthropology, ↑boingboing posted on ↑Ben Mendelsohn‘s documentary ↑Bundled, Buried & Behind Closed Doors: I want to share a short documentary that I recently produced about the hidden Infrastructure of the Internet called Bundled, Buried and Behind Closed Doors. The video is meant to remind viewers that the Internet is a physical, geographically anchored thing. It features a tour inside Telx’s 9th floor Internet exchange at 60 Hudson Street in New York City, and explores how … Continue reading

Share

culture’s shadow

Tonight the opening of ↑this year’s EthnoFilmFest in Munich (16 through 20 November 2011) will take place at the Völkerkundemuseum [Ethnological Museum]. The festival, and Munich meanwhile being renowned for visual anthropology, is largely due to the work of my colleague, friend, and teacher ↑Frank Heidemann. Now that I have duly paid my compliments, it’s time for an anecdote.     Frank’s not only active behind the scenes, but had his own television series, starring himself, ‘Der lange Schatten von Kultur’ [Culture’s long shadow], which aired on ↑BR-alpha, but unfortunately isn’t available online at the moment.     While the … Continue reading

Share

ethnographic times

With ↑this year’s EthnoFilmFest in Munich close (16 through 20 November 2011) I remembered some old associations.     The above screenshot is taken from the 46 seconds short film “↑Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory,” the first of a series of ten short films presented at the ↑very first commercial screening of movies—on 28th December 1895 in Paris, at the Salon Indien du Grand Café. The short piece is a documentary film, or an ethnographic film—if you take ethnographic in the strict sense of the term.     41 years later Chaplin brought “Modern Times” (1936) on the silver screen, … Continue reading

Share

moore’s magic

On Wikipedia I found the following quote from the ↑Philip K. Dick of our times, ↑Alan Moore, author of e.g. ‘↑Watchmen,’ ‘↑V for Vendetta,’ ‘↑From Hell,’ and ‘↑The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen,’ illustrating his quite secular vision of magic—the vision of a real magician: I believe that magic is art, and that art, whether that be music, writing, sculpture, or any other form, is literally magic. Art is, like magic, the science of manipulating symbols, words or images, to achieve changes in consciousness … Indeed to cast a spell is simply to spell, to manipulate words, to change people’s consciousness, … Continue reading

Share

television

Frankly, I do not really know the reasons. But since four months the visits on my weblog here are steadily increasing. The average number of unique visitors for this month today is 2300 (bots and access with special http-status [me] not counted). Plus, people more and more are downloading ↵my Q3A-config. I would understand downloading the configs of Thresh, fatal1ty, cooller, and the like—but the config of a miserable player like me? Maybe the increase of popularity has to do with the airing of the short 6min feature about “↑Second Life“ (SL) I took part in on 29 March 2007? … Continue reading

Share

gamer br

↓Gamer br [46:50min | .avi | 147.3MB] by Pedro Bayeux and Flavio Soares: is a Brazilian documentary about the game scene around here. It gives voice to gamers, producers, lanhouse owners, journalists, psychologists, anthropologists, politicians, government representatives and game enthusiasts about questions as professional gaming, market, ‘addiction’, piracy, policies of incentive, censorship and the so discussed ‘violence’ in games. [my emphasis] And finally it builds up to a very sensible discussion of ‘the virtual’. All in all I take Gamer br to be a kind of ethnological documentary. Just for the flavor, here are some snippets from the English subtitles: … Continue reading

Share

evocational ethnography

Since “Writing Culture” (Clifford & Marcus 1986) there is a lot of discussion about writing ethnographies in literary style(s). In my view the discussions inside visual anthropology deals with quite the same set of problems and issues transponed to the media still photography and moving image. Somehow hypermedia, the computer, and the Internet merge all this together. So every cyber/anthropologist doing work visibly online (like me here) sooner or later has to try to get wiser from writing culture and visual anthropology. Tobias Rees’ paper “Writing culture — Filming Culture” (Rees 1998) comes in handy, in my opinion. [One advantage … Continue reading

Share