tri knot

  The above was uploaded to YouTube by McGreyling on 22 September 2010 and shows how to tie a before unknown inverse tie knot. Like Edeity’s knot, Henry Hu’s Hen Tie, and Lord Whimsy’s Merovingian it is of size 11. In the video McGreyling doesn’t stick to the convention of having the tie’s wide blade hanging to the right (from the wearer’s point of view). So, for sequencing I mirrored the movements in the video. In Fink-Mao notation McGreyling’s knot reads like this:     Ri Co Ri Lo Ci Ro Li Co TRi Lo TCi [ET]     In … Continue reading

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inverse in time

Due to public demand I created the category ↵sartorial and the tag ↵dandyism. For starters I hauled over five according entries from ↑ye ole xirdalium. In detail and with background information, pictures, sequences, diagrams, and movies you now can read the, more or less, full story of the inverse tie knots (in chronological order): ↵merovingian ties, ↵more merovingian ties, ↵the eldredge, ↵eldredge variant, and finally ↵eldredge reloaded.     This comes in time with ‘↑In Time‘ (Niccol 2011) still in the cinemas—at least over here in Europe. I thought I had spotted it while seeing the movie ↵just recently. So … Continue reading

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eldredge reloaded

  With the video Jeffrey “cwtrain” Eldredge uploaded to YouTube yesterday, the story of the inverse tie-knots finally seems to have come to an end. In the video Jeffrey demonstrates exactly ↵the sequence I had come up with on 19 October 2008. This knotting-sequence I had christened ‘Eldredge Variant,’ because all I did was adding two through-the-loop moves to Jeffrey’s original sequence, thereby making it into a knot. Since then I regularly wear the knot in public and even made inverse tie-knots the core topic of my Habilitationsvortrag ‘↑There is no Merovingian! Tie-knots, Neo-Dandyism and Cyberculture,’ presented on 03 February … Continue reading

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eldredge variant

To my eyes ↵the ‘Eldredge’ is an absolute beauty, but the solution Jeffrey Eldredge chose for the final move does not exactly leave us with a ‘knot’ in the technical sense of the term. He simply tucks what is left of the narrow end of the tie away under the collar and the loop the tie forms around the neck. That way we depend on the pressure the loop around the neck exerts on the collar for the whole structure not to come apart. To improve this situation I added two ‘through-the-loop’ movements to Jeffrey’s invention. Translated to Fink-Mao notation, … Continue reading

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the eldredge

It is uncanny, the development is still unfolding. After I learned about the inverse tie knots, invented by edeity, and clearly transcending Fink & Mao’s 85 ways, I made some calculations—of course by means of the formulas devised by Fink & Mao, and spent a thought or two on the matter. The original ‘Edeity’ knot and the ‘Hen Tie’ are of size 11, comprising 4 center moves. Formula (15) (Fink & Mao 2000: 115) teaches us, that there are 80 knots within this class. Edeity’s ingenious idea to wind the narrow end around the tie’s wide blade, instead of the … Continue reading

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more merovingian ties

After having published ↵merovingian ties—beyond the 85 knots of Fink and Mao, I started to contact some of the involved protagonists. ↑Lord Whimsy was the first to answer and confirmed a suspicion of mine. To my question on how he discovered the knot, Whimsy answered: ‘If memory serves, I found a few sources online (I believe it was a pdf file somewhere). After some failed attempts of my own, I finally figured it out.’ So, it seems that Whimsy got hold of the same tutorial by edeity, ↑published at zgeek, with which Henry Hu started out. Like Henry, Whimsy, too, … Continue reading

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Favorite merovingian ties

beyond the 85 knots of Fink and Mao  Most of you have not noticed, I presume, because when the ↑character ‘Merovingian’ (Lambert Wilson) first appears in ‘↑Matrix Reloaded‘ (2003), your eyes were on ↑‘Persephone’ (Monica Bellucci) at his side. But, if you would have watched the Merovingian, and would have slid down your gaze from his face a bit—not quite as far as you practiced on Miss Bellucci—you would have noticed, that the man sports a decidedly strange looking knot on his necktie. Meanwhile there is a knot around which seems to resemble the one in the movie, and indeed … Continue reading

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steampunk flat panel

  Because his ↵steampunk keyboard mod “looked terribly anachronistic” in front of his flat panel display, Jake von Slatt, proprietor of ↑The Steampunk Workshop voided the warranty of his ↑monitor and modified it, too, because “art must be served.” … Continue reading

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computer choppers

  ↑Computer Choppers of West Linn, Oregon, builds custom computers, laptops, and electronics on request. Additionally they manufacture “limited-run specialty items,” of which the above pictured, 24karat goldplated MacBook Pro with diamonds is an example. Besides the fictional Auric Goldfinger, another ↵potential customer for items like those meanwhile is deceased … … Continue reading

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dart plane

Remember Gaff (Edward James Olmos) continuously leaving behind tiny origami artefacts, thereby more or less cryptically commenting situations in “↑Blade Runner“? The ↑famous unicorn in particular? Well, during the Christmas days I unearthed a book I 15 years ago ordered from Dover Publications: Gery Hsu’s 1992 “How to make origami airplanes that fly.” The inside of my copy is littered with quarter- and half-finished specimen. Obviously I tried out a lot of models, but always had to give up and abandon the projects—with the exception of the very first model in the book, the “Space Shuttle” (pp. 12-15)—glides greatly! With … Continue reading

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