Favorite martyr fuller

a sports-journalist’s biased commentary Last night 100-metres-men Olympic champion Merton Fuller was belatedly disqualified because of the results of a “doping test” done within the hour after his triumph. Inside one of the joints of his prosthetic augmentation a silicon-based “banned lubricant” was discovered. The tragedy of the case lies in the fact that none of the lubricant’s ingredients is to be found on the list of banned substances. Neither is the composition of the lubricant illegal. This is little wonder as there is no list of banned substances since 01 January 2020. So, what happened yesterday evening?     … Continue reading

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Favorite antikythera mechanism

sponges, gears, and characters sponges “I have an idea,” Poseidonios thought on the Greek island of Rhodes, simultaneously having in mind the idea he referred to, and the meta-idea of having that very idea. “I have an idea,” Charles Babbage thought a mere twothousand years later in Victorian London, simultaneously having in mind the idea he referred to, and the meta-idea of having that very idea. Both savants thought of the mechanical computer. The 22 oarsmen’s strained muscles are driving the two vessels eastward. Both caiques are laden with sponges, brought to the surface by a party of six divers … Continue reading

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collaborative game research

A new project promising new insights into the history and development of computergames, as it focusses on the perspective of innovations:  The goal of the GIDb [↑Game Innovation Database] is to classify and record every innovation in the entire history of computer and videogames. Because we could never complete this daunting task alone, we have made the GIDb an open wiki, allowing anyone to easily add innovation entries for the benefit of everyone who cares about the history, study, and practice of game innovation. And then McKenzie Wark, author of “A Hacker Manifesto” has put the draft of his next … Continue reading

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history and development of lan groups

↑SWALWELL, MELANIE. 2004. ↑The history and development of lan groups: An australasian case study. [.pdf | 160KB] ↑Proceedings of the ↑Other Players Conference, Center for Computer Games Research, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark. 6-8 December 2004.  abstract: Few research projects have inquired into Lanning, the practice where gamers play multiplayer games with and against each other, usually over purpose built local area networks (LAN), or Lans (the exceptions are Swalwell, 2003; Jansz). Lan gaming is not only an important precursor to newer forms of networked gaming; it is also an evolving form of gaming in its own right. This paper … Continue reading

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from pong to planet quake

gamemodding as post-industrial unwaged work ↑POSTIGO, HECTOR R. 2003. ↑From Pong to Planet Quake: Post-industrial transitions from leisure to work [.pdf | 88KB]. ↑Information, Communication & Society ↑6(4):593–607.  abstract: In the closing weeks of 2002, video games were featured in various popular American news publications and media outlets such as Wired, Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek and Time Magazine. It is becoming increasingly apparent that video games are no longer child’s play, but rather that they are poised to become a major entertainment form for the twenty-first century. Social analysts and media scholars must begin to formulate an understanding of this emerging … Continue reading

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time machine cuba

  Within every human individual there is a personal eclectic conglomeration of ambiences and narrative content built from a lifetime of experience, assimilating information, and digesting popular culture. When this conglomerations are shared by a group of people, we deal with the metaphorical and symbolical web which we call ‘culture’. The latter is constituted, built and rebuilt by ever-changing, interlocking feedback loops of the associative kind. William Gibson not only “has tapped right into our collective cultural mainline”, but delivers a personal account of how ‘culture’ is generated within the individual. Here’s a quote from his essay ↑time machine cuba—I … Continue reading

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animac

  The picture above is a “photo montage featuring a dancer with body mounted sensors controlling real-time animation on the ANIMAC, 1962, Denver.”—another pre-cyberpunk cyberpunk-image. Weird coincidence—provoked by my entries on Tron and the interaction with SFAM, I remembered that there was a student-project in gamedesign which culminated in writing a full-fledged 3D-engine. The final product was a racing-game based on the solar sailor seen in the movie Tron. Unfortunately I couldn’t find anything about it on my HDD, so I went on searching the Internet. During the search I stumbled over ↑A Critical History of Computer Graphics and Animation, … Continue reading

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technology underground

  ↑GURSTELLE, WILLIAM. 2006. ↑Adventures from the technology underground: Catapults, pulsejets, rail guns, flamethrowers, Tesla coils, air cannons, and the garage warriors who love them . New York: ↑Clarkson Potter.  The technology underground is a thriving, humming, and often literally scintillating subculture of amateur inventors and scientific envelope-pushers who dream up, design, and build machines that whoosh, rumble, fly—and occasionally hurl pumpkins across enormous distances. In the process they astonish us with what is possible when human imagination and ingenuity meet nature’s forces and materials. William Gurstelle spent two years exploring the most fascinating outposts of this world of wonders: … Continue reading

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half real

  ↑Jesper Juul, ↑the ludologist, has published his book ↑half-real—here’s the ↑about:  A video game is half-real: we play by real rules while imagining a fictional world. We win or lose the game in the real world but we slay a dragon (for example) only in the world of the game. In this thought-provoking study, Jesper Juul examines the constantly evolving tension between rules and fiction in video games. Discussing games from Pong to The Legend of Zelda, from chess to Grand Theft Auto, he shows how video games are both a departure from and a development of traditional non-electronic … Continue reading

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