flying sphere

Star Wars fans (like me) will get a vague sense of deja vu when they see this flying sphere in action. Weighing in at about 12 ounces (350 g), the 16-inch (42 cm) diameter flying ball can launch and return vertically, maintain a stationary hover and zip along at up to 37 mph (60 km/h). Coupled with the ball camera we reported on earlier this month, it could become a valuable reconnaissance platform. Who knows? In time, more advanced autonomous versions might actually be used to train would-be Jedi knights. Once again, life imitates art.     Announced last summer … Continue reading

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who ate it?

zeph’s pop culture quiz #3 From this one I shied away, as I sincerely do loath the kitten Internet meme. But due to the fate of the kitten in the movie from which the screenshot was taken … without further ado here is this Monday’s question: Who ate the kitten?     Because ↵#1 who is it? and ↵#2 who built it? both were solved so quickly, I refrain from giving more information right from the beginning.     Just leave a comment with your educated guess—you can always ask for additional hints, and I’ll provide them. [Leaving a comment … Continue reading

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moving image archive

This is a straight attack on your precious time—but the weekend is dawning anyway.     The ↑Moving Image Archive has, among other goodies, a huge ↑collection of feature films, which can be viewed and/or downloaded legally for free—there are gems like ↓Night of the Living Dead. This is possible because e.g. the copyright on a movie has expired. But that does not mean that you’ll only find very old movies there. Legal curiosities force movies into the public domain, too. Like when the copyright notice by some mistake didn’t make it to the movie’s release print.     Of … Continue reading

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abandoned homes

The best comment I read on this was the wonderfully ironic: ” … and you thought it was made of Lego.” Having recovered from that realization, here’s the next hit: This is a picture of ↑Two Story with Basement, ↑Mike Doyle‘s first Lego creation (not counting what he did as a kid). Meanwhile he has added two more projects to his abandoned homes series: ↑Victorian with Tree and ↑Victorian on Mud. More at Mike’s blog ↑snap (including very insightful essays) and at ↑his MOCpages page.     Especially interesting for anthropologists: Mike does not cease to emphasize that his creations … Continue reading

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objects

My new hardware components will arrive on Thursday, but I couldn’t keep my hands off ↵DX3. So I went back to the beginning of the story, where framerates still are decent, and tried to find a suitable object for KerLeone’s ↵suitcase challenge. I searched David Sarif’s office thoroughly—while he kept on urging me to hurry and go see what the matter was in lab subsection 6—but couldn’t find a single object which was manipulable. In the corner behind David’s desk I saw his suitcase, already packed for our projected trip to D.C., and my hopes went up. But nothing, zero, … Continue reading

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infiltration

my first ↑vig! The good Evil Doctor to be seen here just recently found out that his newest invention, the death-ray, is just perfectly suited for joining aquatic cartilage and human tissue. While welding the head of a ↑Galeocerdo cuvier upon his latest victim, the latter’s comrades have discovered a sneaky path into his well secured laboratory …     It’s not a mere tradition but a rule that supervillains, ↑mad scientists in particular, build their secret hide-outs and laboratories within or right above active volcanoes at the brink of eruption. In sharp contrast to public opinion this has significant … Continue reading

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1945-1998

Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998, beginning with the Manhattan Project’s “Trinity” test near Los Alamos and concluding with Pakistan’s nuclear tests in May of 1998. This leaves out North Korea’s two alleged nuclear tests in this past decade (the legitimacy of both of which is not 100% clear). Isao Hashimoto himself on his ‘1945-1998′: This piece of work is a bird’s eye view of the history by scaling down a month length of time into one second. No letter is … Continue reading

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omega legend

how the cyberpunk discourse infested the zombie genre  That may well be a truism, but ↑Stephen King is fond of zombie movies (1981: 134), of Romero’s classics of course in particular. Cyberpunk writers and fans are, too. But in ↑George A. Romero‘s debut ‘↑Night of the Living Dead‘ (1968) none of the canonical elements outlining cyberpunk as a genre can be found—with the exception of the postapocalyptic setting. Ten years later, during the historical threshold when the cyberpunk discourse reached critical mass and got manifest as a literary genre, the picture had changed. Richard Kadrey and Larry McCaffery sum it … Continue reading

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resurrection

It was decided before it happened. Never would I have left him 4 dead. Nobody is left behind—that’s a maxime. Furthermore there still were signs of life deep within, he had been a faithful comrade for almost five years, and I had built him myself.     Last night, when I switched on my big machine, the LEDs on the optical drives began to flicker. Nothing else. Both screens remained blank. Flat black, nothing of the grey appearing when a TV-set is tuned to a dead channel.     Not even the BIOS came up.     Ladies and Gentlemen, … Continue reading

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lovecraftian tintin

Artist Murray Groat has created four wonderfully atmospheric Hergé meets Lovecraft covers for Adventures of Tintin albums that sadly will never be. There of course is a vast tradition of homage-à-Tintin covers, often linked to current affairs, like Zartosht Soltani’s Tintin in Tehran from 2002, and many more, but I haven’t yet seen Tintin associated with Lovecraft’s universe. via entry @ infocult … Continue reading

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