anthropology coming of age

welcome to the 21st century    Since quite a time ↵I was eagerly awaiting ‘↑Coming of age in Second Life: An anthropologist explores the virtually human‘ by ↑Tom Boellstorff—it just arrived with yesterday’s snail-mail, so I had not yet the chance to read Tom’s book from front to back cover. Until now I only read chapter 1 ‘Subject and scope,’ plus a dozen or so random paragraphs from throughout the book. Hence I am not yet qualified to deliver a review, instead I will jot down just some thoughts.  Although ‘↑Second Life‘ (SL) is not the focus of my own … Continue reading

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virtual ethnography

Vol. 8, No. 3 of Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research is dedicated to the topic of “↑Virtuelle Ethnographie / Virtual Ethnography“. The whole content is online for free, most of the texts in German, English, and Spanish versions.  via entry at ethno::log … Continue reading

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brave new world ethnography

Just got an e-mail from my friend ↑Maurizio Teli, whom I learned to know ↑eastward in ↑Brno at ↑daylight. He presented a paper in the same workshop where I did, and I was completely blown away by his systematic and clear-cut thoughts on the methodology of doing ethnographical fieldwork online. If you are interested in this topic, head over to his website, dig down into his ↑publications section, download, read, and get wise. By the way, why does everybody (who was at the Cyberspace 2005 conference) in conversation with me mention those distracting girls there and adds a smiley? … Continue reading

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defrag wikipedia

wikipedia as a field medium—the case of the DeFRaG mod  Still I am preoccupied with writing my article on “The playful appropriation of gamespace—From skilful playing to gamemodding and back again,” or so. A bit late, you may say, as the article is due in two weeks already [Yes, Mr Chair of Anthropology, Sir, I am also going to prepare that presentation you invited me for, in time ;-) But, as you know, I am—just like you—more prone to the hands-on things, than to theoretical write-ups. Erh … which doesn’t show up prominently in my publications till now, I know.], … Continue reading

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Favorite anthropology’s shades

Among the qualities which the issues anthropologists take up and belabour have, there is one which stings and delivers a lot of pain, again and again, during the whole process from shaping your project and defining the particular subject to writing the final text: No matter what topic you struggle with, sooner or later it appears to be integrally connected with a shipload of other issues and aspects. There is always the itch to scratch beneath the surfaces of this other aspects, to widely read around, to learn more new things. If you completely give way to this impulse you … Continue reading

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cyberanthropology—anthropology of cyberculture

↑BUDKA, PHILIPP AND ↑MANFRED KREMSER. 2004. “↑CyberAnthropology—Anthropology of CyberCulture” [.pdf | 715KB], in Contemporary issues in socio-cultural anthropology: Perspectives and research activities from Austria edited by S. Khittel, B. Plankensteiner and M. Six-Hohenbalken (eds.), pp. 213-226. Vienna: Loecker.  abstract: This article investigates the historical development, the major theories and the ethnographic domains of an anthropology of cyberculture. In doing so, the authors use Arturo Escobar’s influential paper on cyberanthropology, written in 1994, and connect potential research questions posed in this text with research projects recently conducted at the Viennese Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology. The authors conclude that the … Continue reading

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ethnographic hypermedia

↑ANDERSON, KEVIN TAYLOR. 1999. ↑Ethnographic hypermedia: Transcending thick descriptions. ↑SIGHTS: Visual Anthropology Forum. Working paper from the visual anthropology workshop and course Transcultural Images and Visual Anthropology organized by ↑The Centre for Cross-Cultural Research, 3 to 28 August, 1998. Canberra: Australian National University of Canberra. Electronic Document. Available online: http://cc.joensuu.fi/sights/kevin.htm  In 1986 Marcus and Clifford compiled a series of essays entitled Writing Culture [↵Clifford & Marcus 1986], which spawned critical academic debate and reassessment of the practice of ethnography itself. Yet, for all of the arguments and debates contained within the book, and those which have followed […], the discourse … Continue reading

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videogamestudies

cultural difference on intercultural persistent state worlds Alan Meades, a Masters-degree (Electronic Arts) student at Middlesex University (UK) does post-graduate research in cyberanthropology: “This study aims to verify if players originating from geographically and culturally different backgrounds exhibit different game preferences, and therefore behaviour within Massively Multiplayer Online games. This study focuses specifically on Square-Enix’s Final Fantasy XI because of the design of the server infrastructure, and the resultant feature that each server is shared with people from many cultures and nations. […]“ On his website Alan hosts an according online-survey, both in English and Japanese language! When I hit … Continue reading

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