in the wake of modding

  Now is the time to hop aboard: “↑Remedy Entertainment, the developer of the ↑Max Payne games and one of the leading independent game studios in the world, is ↑looking for Gameplay Designers to work on the upcoming next-generation title ↑Alan Wake.” The most interesting to me is this line from the ↑recruitment info‘s list of desired skills: “Proven experience with modding, level editors, scripting and creation of story-driven gameplay”  via entry at brightfalls.com … Continue reading

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gamemodding definitions

The wall went down last month. From now on in computer gaming, there were to be no real barriers between creator and audience, or producer and consumer. They would be collaborators in the same imaginative space, and working as equals, they’d create a new medium, together. (↵Au 2002)  “Day of Defeat” is a mod—a fan-made modification to a pre-existing game. Or, in modder jargon, it’s a “total conversion,” the most ambitious form of mod, in which all the graphics and gameplay of the original title have been reshaped by fans to create an entirely new experience. (↵Au 2002)  The community … Continue reading

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mod researchers

Some day in the first half of April 2002 I ↵stumbled over gamemodding and slowly realized that there was more than something in it, legitimizing an anthropological look. Before that I was aware of player-created game-content, as I had played ↑“Descent” (1995) and lots of custom maps for it, but at that time I did in no way associate the thing with anthropology. This completely changed with my first encounter with the Max-Payne community, and since then I every day get more convinced that gamemodding is a relevant and central contemporary issue to be fathomed academically. Back in 2002 I … Continue reading

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kirkpatrick 2004 excerpts

Technological politics and the networked PC  However, the best illustration of the kind of positive cultural politics envisaged here concerns the culture of game modification. Games players write and exchange ‘mods’—modifications to games programs that include new twists of storyline and environment—and have succeeded, through this activity, in obliging games producers to leave their source code open for this purpose, something hackers have not yet persuaded the manufacturers of Windows to do. This has been achieved through the market, with astute games manufacturers recognising that there was demand for games with accessible source code, but also through successful negotiation and … Continue reading

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the art of gamemodding

  It seems that the time of harvesting the fruits of my efforts finally has arrived. Today again an invitation to write an article for an anthology came in—I didn’t even send a proposal … God, am I satisfied and proud. Alas, the problem is the now emerged density of deadlines. But self-organization is the key to damming up this kind of trouble. So I skimmed through my physical and digital folders and found yet another abstract I submitted to … well, honestly, I can’t remember where to I sent it. But obviously it was not accepted or even received. … Continue reading

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equilibrium

  The aficionados of course ↑can not accept cyberpunk to be a “long-since dead relic of the 80s,” but “consider it to be alive and well.” Not surprisingly I completely second that. Although ↑Bruce Sterling himself ↑sees it to belong to the 80s’ “Movement” and calls for a new generation, and although the terms “cyberpunk”, “cyberspace” and the like have virtually no meaning within my tribe’s, the ↵MP-community’s discourse [in said context “Gibson” again—or still—is associated with &uarrguitars and not with ↑a writer], I deem cyberpunk alive and well, too. Furthermore I think it to still be dramatically influential—and important … Continue reading

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game modding, intermediality and participatory culture

Hell, am I backward! And—concerning everything connected to ICTs—Scandinavia has its nose way up front, as usual. ↑2R just hinted me via e-mail—tnx a lot, man—to a paper by Olli Sotamaa:  ↑SOTAMAA, OLLI. 2003. ↑Computer game modding, intermediality and participatory culture [.pdf | 146KB]. Paper presented at the PhD course ↑New Media? New Theories? New Methods? organised by: The Nordic network “Innovating Media and Communication Research”, 1-5 December 2003, The Sandbjerg Estate—Aarhus University Conference Centre.  Here are the last three paragraphs of the introduction:  My intention in this article is to analyze the forms and meanings of gamer-made designs and … Continue reading

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co-creative media

↑MORRIS, SUE. 2004. ↑Co-creative media: Online multiplayer computer game culture. ↑Scan: Journal of media arts culture ↑1(1).  abstract: As a new and emerging research area, computer games demand the development of new theoretical frameworks for research and analysis. In addition to the specific requirements of a new medium, the advent and rapidly rising popularity of multiplayer computer gaming creates further challenges for researchers when the text under analysis forms a locus for human interaction – structuring and mediating communication between large numbers of people, and spawning social practices and identifications within a cultural economy extending beyond the game itself. While … Continue reading

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from pong to planet quake

gamemodding as post-industrial unwaged work ↑POSTIGO, HECTOR R. 2003. ↑From Pong to Planet Quake: Post-industrial transitions from leisure to work [.pdf | 88KB]. ↑Information, Communication & Society ↑6(4):593–607.  abstract: In the closing weeks of 2002, video games were featured in various popular American news publications and media outlets such as Wired, Entertainment Weekly, Newsweek and Time Magazine. It is becoming increasingly apparent that video games are no longer child’s play, but rather that they are poised to become a major entertainment form for the twenty-first century. Social analysts and media scholars must begin to formulate an understanding of this emerging … Continue reading

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