lem

  Last monday, 27 March 2006, world renowned science fiction writer Stanislaw Lem died at age 84 in Krakow, his home city. When I was a teenager, every day right after school I stalked the book joint at the station just before catching the train home. Either I bought a science fiction paperback, when I had money, or I eagerly leafed through them as long as time would permit. Strange thing to me was that apparently nobody grown-up I knew thought about science fiction in positive terms, quite to the contrary. The teachers in school, who, among other things, were … Continue reading

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cyberpunk review

  No, that’s neither ↵Teh_Masterer, nor ↵him—it’s a character out of ↑Mamoru Oshii’s 2001 movie Avalon. I took the screencap from ↑cyberpunkreview.com, a blog and “The most complete cyberpunk movie site on the net”. It’s nicely organised, decently looking, and the reviews are in-depth. Everyone with an inclination towards cyberpunk will find movies there s/he desperately wants to watch. And there’s more—beyond reviews—there. Cyberpunkreview.com goes directly into my blogroll. … Continue reading

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fun

After last year’s excellent Rules of play (↵Salen & Zimmerman 2004) now everybody recommends:  KOSTER, RAPH. 2005. A theory of fun for game design. Scottsdale, Arizona: Paraglyph Press.  For background information see the according ↑entry at game matters with extensive comments, and ↑Conversation with Raph Koster by Celia Pearce. And if we’re talking about ‘definitive’ books on computergames, here’s a hint: Chris Crawford’s classic ↑The art of computer game design is online already since 1997. Just to round it up, the ludologist ↑points to ↑The evolution of gaming: computers, consoles, and arcade, another take on game history. And then, academics … Continue reading

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top 20 g33k novelz

The influence of literary fiction and movies is not to neglect when trying to understand cyberculture, the cultural appropriation of ICTs, or parts of that. Currently ↑The Guardian‘s ↑technology blog has a ↑top twenty list of geek novels, constrcuted by a vote open to all citizens of geekdom. An interesting thread of comments has developed, too. And if you still do not know what to present yourself for Christmas … via entry at infocult … Continue reading

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visual jack in

“A half century of artificial-sight research has succeeded. And now this blind man can see,” ↑reports Wired with an impressive, well written story about an american laboratory, which is working with cameras that bring vision directly by cables into the brain of a blind man: From a few steps closer, I see that the wires plug into Patient Alpha’s head like a pair of headphones plug into a stereo. The actual connection is metallic and circular, like a common washer. So seamless is the integration that the skin appears to simply stop being skin and start being steel.     … Continue reading

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