visualcomplexity

  Graphical visualization of data is definitely ↵something I am fond of. For aesthetical reasons, but for pragmatic ones, too—sometimes. Anyway, ↑visualcomplexity is a great resource:  VisualComplexity.com intends to be a unified resource space for anyone interested in the visualization of complex networks. The project’s main goal is to leverage a critical understanding of different visualization methods, across a series of disciplines, as diverse as Biology, Social Networks or the World Wide Web. I truly hope this space can inspire, motivate and enlighten any person doing research on this field. ↑[…] via entry at knowledging across life’s curriculum … Continue reading

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Tim Berners-Lee’s blog!

“Now in 2005, we have blogs and wikis, and the fact that they are so popular makes me feel I wasn’t crazy to think people needed a creative space.” —Sir Timothy Berners-Lee Sir Timothy “Tim” John Berners-Lee, the legend who invented the World Wide Web, now has a weblog: ↑timbl’s blog. Till a second ago there only was one entry yet (↑So I have a blog, written one week ago), but—hold your breath—already 395 comments. This of course goes directly into my blogroll. via entry at boingboing … Continue reading

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weblog and blog reference list

↑Lois Ann Scheidt has compiled an astounding 128-pages ↑bibliography on blogging [.pdf | 459KB], which is partially augmented with abstracts and links. And if you are already at it, check out her weblog, too: ↑Professional-Lurker: Comments by an academic in cyberspace. via entry at digitalgenres … Continue reading

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research on blogging

The latest issue of Kommunikation@Gesellschaft is dedicated to ↑Exploring blogging: Social science approaches and perspectives of weblog-research [in German]. Since recently the online-journal Kommunikation@Gesellschaft is accompanied by the ↑k@g-Blog. via entry at zerzaust … Continue reading

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spooknik

On 4 October 1957 ↑Stephen King was at the cinema. Together with the other ten-year-olds clustered around him he watched the morning performance of ↑Earth vs. the Flying Saucers. Just as the flying saucers started their attack on Washington D.C. the movie was interrupted and the houselights went on. Pale and nervous the manager entered the auditorium. “‘I want to tell you’, he said in that trembly voice, ‘that the Russians have put a space satellite into orbit around the earth. They call it … Spootnik.’” (↵King 1993[1981]:21) For the assembled post-war kids a world crashed. The world of US-American … Continue reading

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otaku, doujinshi, and gamemodding

↑Mizuko Ito [↵keitai-scholar and sister of blogosphere-legend ↑Joi Ito] introduces us to ↑Otaku Media Literacy—if one would replace ‘anime otaku’ by ‘gamemodders’ and add one or two adjustments, her text still would be ‘the truth’. Here’s an excerpt: ↑[…] Overseas anime otaku—fans of Japanese anime—represent an emergent form of media literacy that, though still marginal, is becoming increasingly pervasive among a rising generation. Anime otaku are media connoisseurs, activist prosumers who seek out esoteric content from a far away land and organize their social lives around viewing, interpreting, and remixing these media works. Otaku translate and subtitle all major anime … Continue reading

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keitai

The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as “something you carry with you”), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan’s enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become—along with anime, manga, and sushi—part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.     The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications … Continue reading

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no comment

The last weekend was dedicated to dealing with rubbish. The flood in Munich—have a look at the ↑photos by 2R—had powerfully hit our basement, too. But till Friday the hip-high waters had been pumped off. So, on Saturday morning I did a review of our cellared items and decided to throw nearly everything away. Shortly after noon it was done. A friend dropped by and took me along to ↑Heavens Gate, a phantastically relaxed indoor-climbing facility. When the first wave of exhaustion came we took a break, withdrew to the sofa-corner, and had a coffee. Right next to us I … Continue reading

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