DGV05: new logic of conflict

Local conflicts go online by ↑Birgit Bräuchler In contrast to conventional (mass)media the so called ‘new media’—among them the most prominent Internet—stand out due to criteria like interaction, multimediality, transcending location, and networking. Because of the named criteria the Internet is able to add a global dimension to local conflicts. This is exemplified by a case study on the Moluccan conflict, which took place from 1999 to 2002 in Eastern Indonesia—mainly between Christians and Muslims. It will be shown how local actors expanded the conflict into the Internet, and which strategies they put to use. During this conflict the Internet … Continue reading

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access

Today I augmented the very first chapter of maxmod’s projected chapters, which is called ↵access—straightforwardedly worded: I beefed it up without adding much content, well there’s some new text, and now I am pimping it shamelessly. It may not have been a great idea to conceptualise the chapters right out of the mælstrom of my consciousness at an early stage of the project. But hey, online everything is easily to be changed and changed again. Everything at my website and weblog is to be understood as work-in-progress. With the aptly named chapter ↵access I attempt to tell my first encounter … Continue reading

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applied cyberanthropology

out of the box—anthropology put to use  Not just since the ↵gates for anthropology were unshuttered at Redmond, ↑corporate anthropology and applied anthropology is striving. And not since just yesterday parts of anthropology are appropriated by kin and not so kin academic provinces, e.g. the discipline ‘marketing’. ↑Markus Giesler’s research is a perfect example. Markus is a young assistant professor of marketing—the fusion formula “(ethnography+Internet)+consumer research=rigorous and pathbreaking research, new marketing and consumer expertise relevant to business and business leaders” earned him the title of being ↑l’anthropologue des cyborgs among the Canadian press. Anthro clearly is hip. In consequence of … Continue reading

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DGV05: internet and anthropology

The Internet and sociocultural anthropology—continuities and breaches A review of approaches to cyberanthropology by ↑Nils Zurawski It took nearly ten years from the ↵Welcome to Cyberia to the ↵Cyberidentities at War. During those ten years the Internet changed from hackers’ and specialists’ playground to common medium. Ten years during which the amount of research on (culturally informed) identities on the net increased steadily. Coexisting, independent from each other, and sometimes as continuations there were smaller and larger projects now and again—dealing with the phenomenon of identity on the net / in cyberspace. As the whole field of activity still being … Continue reading

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gate for anthropology

Chris Kelty ↑already warned us, now it’s published. The June 2005 issue of Fortune Small Business carries an article by Richard McGill Murphy called ↑Getting to Know You (↑also here [.pdf | 53KB]). The subtitle says: “Microsoft dispatches anthropologists into the field to study small businesses like yours. Here’s why.” The New York Times commented with ↑Bill Gates as Anthropologist (login required). The gates into the IT-business are wide open for anthropologists. … Continue reading

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holy men in tights

a superheroes conference At my institute there once was an anthropological project on superhero-comics and the like in the making, but never took off—I will dig up the material from the past and prey on it. Now a conference on the ↵new gods will take place down under: Superheroes and supervillains—whether human or god, born or created, product of nature or creature of science—they have existed as cultural icons for centuries. Why have they endured? How have they transformed over the decades? What is their cultural or mythic function? Where does the hero end and the superhero begin? This interdisciplinary … Continue reading

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