engaging anthropology

↑ERIKSEN, THOMAS HYLLAND. 2006. ↑Engaging anthropology: The case for a public presence. Oxford: ↑Berg.  Anthropology ought to have changed the world. What went wrong? Engaging Anthropology takes an unflinching look at why the discipline has not gained the popularity and respect it deserves in the twenty-first century. From identity to multicultural society, new technologies to work, globalization to marginalization, anthropology has a vital contribution to make. While showcasing the intellectual power of discipline, Eriksen takes the anthropological community to task for its unwillingness to engage more proactively with the media in a wide range of current debates, from immigrant issues … Continue reading

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history, generations, the Internet, and cyberculture

With the decline of Kulturhistorie in German sociocultural anthropology diachronic approaches to culture and society somehow went out of fashion, sometimes even got ostracised, and synchronical approaches started to reign supremely—became tacitly paradigmatic, became fashion. Speaking in a bold and simple style. But I learned that there is no modern sociocultural anthropology without a historical component. In other words: There is hardly any sensible approach to society and culture which completely neglects the diachronic dimension. This is true for all kinds of cultures, e.g for cyberculture, and for academical cultures.  The cultures of sociocultural anthropology—that is what anthropologists did and … Continue reading

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research on blogging

The latest issue of Kommunikation@Gesellschaft is dedicated to ↑Exploring blogging: Social science approaches and perspectives of weblog-research [in German]. Since recently the online-journal Kommunikation@Gesellschaft is accompanied by the ↑k@g-Blog. via entry at zerzaust … Continue reading

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negotiation of ethnicity on the Internet

The Internet—the new global media, linking people transnationally, providing a public for the marginalised, fostering democracy—versus the internet—virtual irreality, detached from the real world, space for escape, leading to social isolation. From these extreme views research has moved to ethnographic analyses of what actually happens online. Especially young people around the world have adopted the internet as their medium, creating their own virtual spaces. The research project “↑The virtual second generation” [in German | parts in English] analyses how, why and with what consequences second generation Indians in Germany do this. via entry at ethno::log … Continue reading

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digital literacy divide

↑Tony Salvador and ↑John Sherry, ↑triple-A members as well as researchers at Intel, have just recently published an article called ↑Taking the Internet to the people (↵Salvador & Sherry 2005), telling us about some of their findings after four years traveling the world to see how computers are used. See ↑Kerim Friedman‘s ↑fine entry on it at ↑Savage Minds, which thankfully points to the related weblog ↑worldchanging. initially via entry at ethno::log … Continue reading

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mecaniqueros

Nothing is impossible in Havanna   My old pal from the glory days of us being anthropology students, all-time-beauty ↑Joanna Michna has done it again. After her ↵ethnological documentary movie on Colombia’s Balineros now there is another one by her to be broadcasted soon on German national television’s high-quality channel arte: ↑Mecániqueros—Nothing is impossible in Havanna. Havanna’s mecániqueros are young private entrepreneurs in the land of socialism in actual practice. They develope cranky, whimsical, sometimes seemingly bizarre business ideas like a restaurant at the living room at home, or light switches made of deodorant cans. Deftly they act in the … Continue reading

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writing hypermedia

The secret of the stairs at Aragon  Essentially, hypermedia is a non-linear multi-media document. By its inclusion of data stored by using the more traditional technologies of representation (film and text for example), in a user-directed, non-linear publication, hypermedia creates a fresh, user-driven means for reading and writing culture. [↵Anderson 1999] So far I agree—but I’d like to amend that ‘a piece of’ hypermedia can contain a linear path, at least there is the possibility to propose one [or more?] linear path[s] to the recipient. Like Astrid Blumstengel did it in her hypertext ↑Entwicklung hypermedialer Lernsysteme [in German].  The non-linear … Continue reading

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ethnographic hypermedia

↑ANDERSON, KEVIN TAYLOR. 1999. ↑Ethnographic hypermedia: Transcending thick descriptions. ↑SIGHTS: Visual Anthropology Forum. Working paper from the visual anthropology workshop and course Transcultural Images and Visual Anthropology organized by ↑The Centre for Cross-Cultural Research, 3 to 28 August, 1998. Canberra: Australian National University of Canberra. Electronic Document. Available online: http://cc.joensuu.fi/sights/kevin.htm  In 1986 Marcus and Clifford compiled a series of essays entitled Writing Culture [↵Clifford & Marcus 1986], which spawned critical academic debate and reassessment of the practice of ethnography itself. Yet, for all of the arguments and debates contained within the book, and those which have followed […], the discourse … Continue reading

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