vectors

visions of dream machines    This is the “Vector W2” prototype of my teenage days in full flight. From certain angles it looks way more interesting than its contemporary successor, the “WX8”—both cars were briefly mentioned in ↵reventón, there also is a picture of the latter. Back in the 1980s the “W2” caused quite some talk, because it not only featured stunning looks—which made it appear in TV commercials and at least one movie—, but also was conceptualized as a ↑supercar, and beyond that thrived for the throne of the ↑fastest production car on the globe—a top speed of 320 … Continue reading

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hexagonal futurism

From November 1964 to the end of 1965 the trinity Gian Paolo Dallara (*1939), Gian Paolo Stanzini, and Bob Wallace in their spare time built the chassis of a new car by which they wanted to convince the old man, ↑Ferrucio Lamborghini (1916-1993) himself, to finally enter the racing circus. Ferrucio was delighted by the chassis and allowed the three to show it off at the 1965 motor show in Turin, Italy. Nevertheless he was reluctant to make a racing car out of it, but instead wanted to use it as the basis for a production car. For creating the … Continue reading

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reventón

    This by far is the most aggressive looking piece of automobile I ever saw. Definitely not ↵steampunk, but a cyberpunk-worthy folly—a car with a basic price tag reading one million Euros, without tax still, and I do not want to know, how much of fuel it digests while covering 100 kilometres—in twenty minutes that is. But let us not discuss this issues now—there is nothing to discuss at all in this respect, in my opinion, because it is obvious that this beast called the Lamborghini “Reventón” simply is an insanity of which only 20 pieces will be manufactured. … Continue reading

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Favorite nemo’s gear

steampunk informed appropriation of mythical worlds and hardware ↑Captain Nemo‘s submarine “Nautilus” on the surface, getting entered by “cannibals”. The picture is for those, maybe a bit more traditionally oriented anthropologists, who dare to doubt that this vessel has anything to do with anthropology. It was clear as a scuttle—sometime around Christmas they would re-air “↑20,000 leagues under the sea,” the 1954 Disney rendition for the silver screen of ↑Jules Verne‘s ↑1870 novel. They always do, and so they did this time. Just having read ↑H. G. Wells‘ brilliant scientific romance “The first men in the moon” (1901), rewatching “Leagues” … Continue reading

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dart plane

Remember Gaff (Edward James Olmos) continuously leaving behind tiny origami artefacts, thereby more or less cryptically commenting situations in “↑Blade Runner“? The ↑famous unicorn in particular? Well, during the Christmas days I unearthed a book I 15 years ago ordered from Dover Publications: Gery Hsu’s 1992 “How to make origami airplanes that fly.” The inside of my copy is littered with quarter- and half-finished specimen. Obviously I tried out a lot of models, but always had to give up and abandon the projects—with the exception of the very first model in the book, the “Space Shuttle” (pp. 12-15)—glides greatly! With … Continue reading

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dart plane

  Remember Gaff (Edward James Olmos) continuously leaving behind tiny origami artefacts, thereby more or less cryptically commenting situations in “↑Blade Runner“? The ↑famous unicorn in particular? Well, during the Christmas days I unearthed a book I 15 years ago ordered from Dover Publications: Gery Hsu’s 1992 “How to make origami airplanes that fly.” The inside of my copy is littered with quarter- and half-finished specimen. Obviously I tried out a lot of models, but always had to give up and abandon the projects—with the exception of the very first model in the book, the “Space Shuttle” (pp. 12-15)—glides greatly! … Continue reading

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android orchestra

It is eerie like hell, in my humble opinion. On 06 December 2007 ↑Toyota revealed two new “Toyota Partner Robots”, one of them able to ↑play the violin. At the World Expo 2005 they already had a couple of robots playing trumpets and horns ↑doing the welcome ceremony—it was a spark of genius to have them play “When the Saints are marching in” while entering the arena. Astounding how the automata of the 19th Century are perfected. But yet another thing strikes me as eerie. Today everybody wonders and cheers at the androids’ abilities to play musical instruments, but nobody … Continue reading

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virtualism in the print news

Within the scope of the “↑Journée d’études “Communautés virtuelles”“ just two weeks ago, on 09 November 2007, I presented a paper called “Material culture and social interaction online: The reality of the virtual” at the Université Marc Bloch, Strasbourg. Besides other things I talked a bit about my idea of “↵virtualism“. ↑Klaus Schönberger, who was in the audience and later in the day delivered a lecture himself, asked who in particular I thought the “virtualists” were. I refrained from calling names and tried to give an a bit abstract description as an answer. Now, Klaus, here is an example.  In … Continue reading

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