reptiles

Once upon a time, when I was a kid, as a present I received a thick catalogue of the works of ↑M. C. Escher—since back then ↵I am hooked. In ↑reply to my telling Weird Tales—see also ↵visual phenomena—, today I received a nice e-mail which rubbed my nose upon one of Escher’s famous lithographs: “↑Reptilien“ (1943). Again wondering at the picture I cherish since decades, suddenly it came to my mind: It’s the perfect metaphor for my cyberanthropological research-project “↵maxmod“. A twodimensional representation of the li’l beasts crawling out of 2D-space, ↵into 3D-space, and back again … meaning those … Continue reading

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visual phenomena

  Is it a eurocentric bias on the visual that the majority of constructivist works start out with optical illusions? I am not sure. But be it as diverse personæ as von Foerster, Watzlawick, Maturana & Varela, or even Francis Crick—Berger & Luckman are an exception—, optical illusions serve as a stunning starter for their arguments. Me personally, I am a downright fanboy of illusions of all kind, hence I am of the opinion, that Alan Sokal’s warning to the social sciences and humanities—not to use metaphors which are way more complicated to understand than the phenomena you want to … Continue reading

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imagine

  Imagine there’s no Heaven It’s easy if you try No hell below us Above us only sky Imagine all the people Living for today  Imagine there’s no countries It isn’t hard to do Nothing to kill or die for And no religion too Imagine all the people Living life in peace You may say that I’m a dreamer But I’m not the only one I hope someday you’ll join us And the world will be as one  Imagine no possessions I wonder if you can No need for greed or hunger A brotherhood of man Imagine all the people … Continue reading

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comic book naturalism

  ↑Steven Spielberg years ago had bought the movie-rights for ↑the adventures of Tintin. He held them for some time, then gave them back, without ever having made a movie from them. Word has it that he meanwhile simply deemed it to be an impossibility to make a movie out of those comic books. The major problem with transposing characters and narrative content from one medium to another, e.g. from comic books to the silver screen—no matter if animation or meatspace-acting—is the imagination of the audience. For example, while reading a comic book you involuntarily give your own voice to … Continue reading

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conceptual heights

When I am forced to speak academish anthropologese, I use to babble about “conceptual spaces of interaction induced by the Internet infrastructure,” or else.  When I was a kid I was forced to read ↑Emily Brontë‘s “Wuthering Heights” in school. Frankly, I never came to grips with it. I mean, just have a look at how ↑Wikipedia sums up one of the main characters, Hindley Earnshaw, who “is Catherine’s brother and Heathcliff’s other rival; having loathed Heathcliff since childhood, Hindley delights in turning Heathcliff into a downtrodden servant upon inheriting Wuthering Heights. However, his wife’s death in childbirth destroys him; … Continue reading

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cyberpunked balkans

  What’s that with the Balkans? ↑Bruce Sterling not only now lives in Belgrade, but tells us in his recent ↑Washington Post article “↑My dot-green future is finally arriving“ about himself “standing among a crowd of radical Serbs in front of the U.S. Embassy in Belgrade last week,” when it dawned on him, that things are perfectly going his way as a futurist: “It’s 2007, and the old world has backfired so comprehensively that a new era is truly at hand. I actually knew this would happen. I guess, for a prophet, this is what victory feels like!” And ↑John … Continue reading

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homer3

  Time and again The-Simpsons-Halloween-Specials are to be seen on television. In one particular episode, “↑Homer 3“ (1996) ↑by Pacific Data Images, Homer tries to hide behind a cupboard as his wife Marge’s sisters are about to pay a visit to the Simpsons’ home. When Homer touches the wall he discovers that he can reach through it. As he is a TV-buff with an ample pop-culture-knowledge, it’s instantaneously clear to him, that through the wall he can reach another dimension, just like he had seen it in “↑The Twilight Zone“ or Tobe Hooper’s “↑Poltergeist“. When the dreaded sisters-in-law approach menacingly, … Continue reading

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wag the dog

In a 1994 television interview with ↑Alexander Kluge, ↑Niklas Luhmann warned: “Vorsicht vor zu raschem Verstehen!” [Attention if something is understood too quickly.] 70 years earlier, Hercule Poirot said: “If a thing is clear as daylight—eh bien, mistrust it! Someone has made it so.”—from Agatha Christie’s “The Disappearance of Mr Davenheim” (1924). … Continue reading

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