animac

  The picture above is a “photo montage featuring a dancer with body mounted sensors controlling real-time animation on the ANIMAC, 1962, Denver.”—another pre-cyberpunk cyberpunk-image. Weird coincidence—provoked by my entries on Tron and the interaction with SFAM, I remembered that there was a student-project in gamedesign which culminated in writing a full-fledged 3D-engine. The final product was a racing-game based on the solar sailor seen in the movie Tron. Unfortunately I couldn’t find anything about it on my HDD, so I went on searching the Internet. During the search I stumbled over ↑A Critical History of Computer Graphics and Animation, … Continue reading

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how games ought to be … ?

Those are all from last year, but very worthwhile:  LONG, DAVID. 2005. ↑LongShot #86: Graphics Don’t Matter. ↑GamerDad. PHELPS, ANDREW. 2005. ↑Graphics Don’t Matter (and other assertions). ↑Got Game?. WONG, DAVID AND HAIMOIMOI. 2005.↑A gamers manifesto. ↑pointless waste of time. … Continue reading

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technology underground

  ↑GURSTELLE, WILLIAM. 2006. ↑Adventures from the technology underground: Catapults, pulsejets, rail guns, flamethrowers, Tesla coils, air cannons, and the garage warriors who love them . New York: ↑Clarkson Potter.  The technology underground is a thriving, humming, and often literally scintillating subculture of amateur inventors and scientific envelope-pushers who dream up, design, and build machines that whoosh, rumble, fly—and occasionally hurl pumpkins across enormous distances. In the process they astonish us with what is possible when human imagination and ingenuity meet nature’s forces and materials. William Gurstelle spent two years exploring the most fascinating outposts of this world of wonders: … Continue reading

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engaging anthropology

↑ERIKSEN, THOMAS HYLLAND. 2006. ↑Engaging anthropology: The case for a public presence. Oxford: ↑Berg.  Anthropology ought to have changed the world. What went wrong? Engaging Anthropology takes an unflinching look at why the discipline has not gained the popularity and respect it deserves in the twenty-first century. From identity to multicultural society, new technologies to work, globalization to marginalization, anthropology has a vital contribution to make. While showcasing the intellectual power of discipline, Eriksen takes the anthropological community to task for its unwillingness to engage more proactively with the media in a wide range of current debates, from immigrant issues … Continue reading

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half real

  ↑Jesper Juul, ↑the ludologist, has published his book ↑half-real—here’s the ↑about:  A video game is half-real: we play by real rules while imagining a fictional world. We win or lose the game in the real world but we slay a dragon (for example) only in the world of the game. In this thought-provoking study, Jesper Juul examines the constantly evolving tension between rules and fiction in video games. Discussing games from Pong to The Legend of Zelda, from chess to Grand Theft Auto, he shows how video games are both a departure from and a development of traditional non-electronic … Continue reading

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reality bytes gaming myths

↑Henry Jenkins III, one of the directors of ↑MIT‘s ↑comparative media studies, has written an article called ↑Reality Bytes: Eight Myths About Video Games Debunked. The eight myths [in this context to be understood as ‘false beliefs’] he deals with are:  1. The availability of video games has led to an epidemic of youth violence. 2. Scientific evidence links violent game play with youth aggression. 3. Children are the primary market for video games. 4. Almost no girls play computer games. 5. Because games are used to train soldiers to kill, they have the same impact on the kids who … Continue reading

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play and violence

  ↑Static, the ↑London Consortium‘s online journal, ↑aims at initiating “interdisciplinary intellectual debate about paradoxes of contemporary culture, Static presents contributions from an international team of academics, artists and cultural practitioners.” The ↑first issue‘s core topic was play and violence—the ↑editorial sounds very promising:  During the month of July 2005, the London Consortium organised a conference on the theme of “Playtime”. This event, which took place at the ICA, was an opportunity for a team of international scholars and artists to discuss the theme of playtime in relation to sports, video games, films, art, and other forms that play can … Continue reading

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weblog and blog reference list

↑Lois Ann Scheidt has compiled an astounding 128-pages ↑bibliography on blogging [.pdf | 459KB], which is partially augmented with abstracts and links. And if you are already at it, check out her weblog, too: ↑Professional-Lurker: Comments by an academic in cyberspace. via entry at digitalgenres … Continue reading

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research on blogging

The latest issue of Kommunikation@Gesellschaft is dedicated to ↑Exploring blogging: Social science approaches and perspectives of weblog-research [in German]. Since recently the online-journal Kommunikation@Gesellschaft is accompanied by the ↑k@g-Blog. via entry at zerzaust … Continue reading

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