synthetic worlds

↑Edward Castronova, who rose to fame with his ↑Virtual worlds: A first hand account of market and society on the cyberian frontier (↵Castronova 2001—see also ↵Castronova 2003 and ↑terra nova) has written his first full-length monograph [↑Overview]:  ↑CASTRONOVA, EDWARD. 2005. Synthetic worlds: the business and culture of online games. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. via entry at digital genres … Continue reading

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keitai

The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as “something you carry with you”), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan’s enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become—along with anime, manga, and sushi—part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.     The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications … Continue reading

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FLOSS developers as a social formation

↑Frauke Lehmann, who will give a ↵presentation at my ↵cyberanthropology workshop, has put her M.A.-thesis (↵Lehmann 2004a) online under a CC-licence. The thesis is called ↑Entwickler Freier Software als soziale Formation [in German | .pdf | 873KB] and an English-language derivate of it (↵Lehmann 2004b) has been published at ↑First Monday: ↑FLOSS developers as a social formation. Here’s the abstract:  Developers of Free/Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS) are often referred to as a community or as a scene. But so far this seems mostly just a rough expression. This paper takes a closer look at FLOSS developers and their … Continue reading

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polylog on violence

The forum for intercultural philosophy ↑polylog has a focus issue on ↑The Meanings of Violence and the Violence of Meanings. Included is an article by Andrew Strathern and Pamela J. Stewart, called ↑Violence: Conceptual Themes and the Evaluation of Actions. Very interesting regarding the computergames & violence issue. And Wim van Binsbergen’s ↑Violence in Anthropology, too. … Continue reading

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military training geeks

Two new publications from the extreme ends of the spectrum, but both touching my topic. Now guess which one of the two is closer to my mind and heart. KELTY, CHRISTOPHER M. 2005. Geeks, Social Imaginaries, and Recursive Publics. Cultural Anthropology 20(2):185-214. official abstract: This article investigates the social, technical, and legal affiliations among “geeks” (hackers, lawyers, activists, and IT entrepreneurs) on the Internet. The mode of association specific to this group is that of a “recursive public sphere” constituted by a shared imaginary of the technical and legal conditions of possibility for their own association. On the basis of … Continue reading

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hypermedia ethnography

Note to me: Checking your own referrer-log ain’t just a bonfire of vanity, but sometimes indeed proofs to be useful. Anthropology student ↑Andrea Handl of Vienna urges me in her ↑blog entry to have a look on the dissertation by Johann Stockinger. Then some soul was good natured enough to click the link to xirdalium Andrea had inserted and presto—I found it in my logs. That’s one of the ways the blogosphere works, I guess. Here’s what I am urged to read: ↑STOCKINGER, JOHANN. 2004. Ethnologische Wissensrepräsentation mittels XML. Univ.-Diss. Wien. Unfortunately it seems not to be published yet. Mr. … Continue reading

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atari archives

Well, back in the 1980s I was in the other camp, because I was a proud owner of a C64—and we somehow looked down on those having an Atari. But that is history, and exactly from that point of view ↑atariarchives.org is very worthwhile, as it “makes books, information, and software for Atari and other classic computers available on the Web. Everything here is available with permission of the copyright holders.” … Continue reading

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