pop replicant

In the ‘Süddeutsche Zeitung,’ one of Germany’s biggest transregional daily newspapers, I just read a wonderful review of the 3D-documentary ‘Never say never’ (Chu 2011) on Justin Bieber. Jan Füchtjohann begins ↑his review thus: Does the teenie-popstar Justin Bieber dream of electrical sheep? Just like in Philip K. Dick’s science-fiction novel and blueprint of ‘Blade Runner,’ ‘Do androids dream of electrical sheep?’ there indeed is a growing number of people who try to find out if Justin Bieber is a regular boy, or a replicant who should be phased out. [my translation—put the blame on me] ‘Never say never’ does … Continue reading

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we, robot

About ↑Mark Stephen Meadows I first heard when I still was deep into ‘↑Second Life‘ (SL). His book ‘I, avatar’ (2008) is outstandingly designed—Meadows is a portrait artist and author by profession—and from all physical books on the topic does by far the most justice to SL in terms of visual representation. In terms of content, it until today is the best I read on the issue of ‘the avatar,’ which Meadows does not restrict to the graphical representation of the user-controlled agent in SL. He understands it as a term for all kinds of online manifestation of a human … Continue reading

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android orchestra

It is eerie like hell, in my humble opinion. On 06 December 2007 ↑Toyota revealed two new “Toyota Partner Robots”, one of them able to ↑play the violin. At the World Expo 2005 they already had a couple of robots playing trumpets and horns ↑doing the welcome ceremony—it was a spark of genius to have them play “When the Saints are marching in” while entering the arena. Astounding how the automata of the 19th Century are perfected. But yet another thing strikes me as eerie. Today everybody wonders and cheers at the androids’ abilities to play musical instruments, but nobody … Continue reading

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zeiss ikon eyes

A discussion-thread at ↑williamgibsonboard, broaching the issue of the ↑actual looks of synthetical eyes within ↑Gibson‘s ↑sprawl trilogy inspired the man himself to write a blog-entry on ↑Molly’s mirrorshades and Zeiss-Ikon eyes. The entry is particularly interesting in respect to precision of description and “the hyperspecificity of the cyberpunk style”. Then Gibson finally comes to the “Zeiss-Ikon eyes”: With the “Zeiss-Ikon eyes”, from “Burning Chrome” [↵Gibson 1987 [1982]], which some readers evidently invision as (gack) German camera lenses, there was a “really”. I assumed they were vat-grown, genetically optically perfect organs, perhaps further tweaked to maximize them as, in effect, … Continue reading

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desperately seeking phil

  ↑Robot goes missing at The Sidney Morning Herald tells a hilarious story:  Philip K Dick is missing. […] a state-of-the-art robot named after the author. The quirky android, was lost in early January while en route to California by commercial airliner. […] Robotics wizard and lead designer David Hanson built the robot as a memorial to Dick, whose 1968 book Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? inspired the 1982 classic Blade Runner starring Harrison Ford. […] In Blade Runner, set in a Los Angeles of 2019, Harrison Ford plays Rick Deckhard, a Blade Runner or policeman whose job is … Continue reading

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desperately seeking phil

Philip K Dick is missing. […] a state-of-the-art robot named after the author.     The quirky android, was lost in early January while en route to California by commercial airliner. […]     Robotics wizard and lead designer David Hanson built the robot as a memorial to Dick, whose 1968 book Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? inspired the 1982 classic Blade Runner starring Harrison Ford. […]     In Blade Runner, set in a Los Angeles of 2019, Harrison Ford plays Rick Deckhard, a Blade Runner or policeman whose job is to track down and terminate escaped human … Continue reading

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