access

Today I augmented the very first chapter of maxmod’s projected chapters, which is called ↵access—straightforwardedly worded: I beefed it up without adding much content, well there’s some new text, and now I am pimping it shamelessly. It may not have been a great idea to conceptualise the chapters right out of the mælstrom of my consciousness at an early stage of the project. But hey, online everything is easily to be changed and changed again. Everything at my website and weblog is to be understood as work-in-progress. With the aptly named chapter ↵access I attempt to tell my first encounter … Continue reading

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anthronauts

Sometimes my babbling indeed hits furtile ground, so I had to update my blogroll: ↑anthronaut [astronauts, argonauts—got it?] is a weblog by “an Anthropology undergraduate student at the LMU Munich. Starting from July 17th 2005, I´ll spend two months working in a warehouse in Istanbul. This weblog is a sort of “field diary” for the length of that stay and maybe longer. I´m going to publish here my working experiences and my reflections about Turkish culture in Istanbul, the one in the enterprise itself and also about Turkish culture and identity in the context of migration.” Hell, I am touched. … Continue reading

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applied cyberanthropology

out of the box—anthropology put to use  Not just since the ↵gates for anthropology were unshuttered at Redmond, ↑corporate anthropology and applied anthropology is striving. And not since just yesterday parts of anthropology are appropriated by kin and not so kin academic provinces, e.g. the discipline ‘marketing’. ↑Markus Giesler’s research is a perfect example. Markus is a young assistant professor of marketing—the fusion formula “(ethnography+Internet)+consumer research=rigorous and pathbreaking research, new marketing and consumer expertise relevant to business and business leaders” earned him the title of being ↑l’anthropologue des cyborgs among the Canadian press. Anthro clearly is hip. In consequence of … Continue reading

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african village

German sociocultural anthropology indeed is engaged in contemporary issues! On 4th of July 2005 the authors Prof. Dr. Nina Glick Schiller, Dr. Data Dea, and [my friend! :-)] Markus Höhne (Ph.D. candidate) have submitted a report to the ↑Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology (Halle/Saale Germany) called: ↑“African Culture and the Zoo in the 21st Century: The ‘African Village’ in the Augsburg Zoo and Its Wider Implications” [↑deep link .pdf | 1.6MB] The report (48 pages—in English) is based on ethnographic fieldwork at said zoo during the four days of the event. The executive summary: The announcement by the zoo … Continue reading

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DGV05: internet and anthropology

The Internet and sociocultural anthropology—continuities and breaches A review of approaches to cyberanthropology by ↑Nils Zurawski It took nearly ten years from the ↵Welcome to Cyberia to the ↵Cyberidentities at War. During those ten years the Internet changed from hackers’ and specialists’ playground to common medium. Ten years during which the amount of research on (culturally informed) identities on the net increased steadily. Coexisting, independent from each other, and sometimes as continuations there were smaller and larger projects now and again—dealing with the phenomenon of identity on the net / in cyberspace. As the whole field of activity still being … Continue reading

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gate for anthropology

Chris Kelty ↑already warned us, now it’s published. The June 2005 issue of Fortune Small Business carries an article by Richard McGill Murphy called ↑Getting to Know You (↑also here [.pdf | 53KB]). The subtitle says: “Microsoft dispatches anthropologists into the field to study small businesses like yours. Here’s why.” The New York Times commented with ↑Bill Gates as Anthropologist (login required). The gates into the IT-business are wide open for anthropologists. … Continue reading

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savage minds

There is a new anthropological group-weblog. The ↑savage minds behind the accordingly named endeavor are ↑Alex Golub, ↑Antti Leppänen, ↑Chris Kelty, ↑Kerim Friedman, ↑Nancy Leclerc, and ↑Dustin M. Wax. ↑anthropologi.info kindly ↑commented: “Great! A new anthropology group blog! Something like an American version of the German ↑Ethno::log.” This comment is kind in respect to the ethno::log, as with the latter we never had the impact savage minds already has after just some days—and I dare say we never had this kind of quality. Not that the entries at ethno::log lack quality, but they possess a different kind of it. Savage … Continue reading

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