call for papers: book on games

Games without frontiers—war without tears Computer games as a sociocultural phenomenon In Germany a new academic book on computergames is in the making. Here is an excerpt from the ↑call for papers: As a rule Computer games remain to be the focus of media attention when specific acts of violence which deeply horrify the audience (war and ampage – Iraq and Erfurt) draw the public’s perception to them. The first ever occuring impetus then is aimed at a more or less serious examination of their dangerous and problematic aspects (blunting people’s senses, playing down and provoking violence, player’s loss of … Continue reading

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call for papers: cyberspace 2005

The call for papers for the ↑Cyberspace 2005 Conference has been released: Paper abstracts are solicited for submission to the following workshops of III. International Conference Cyberspace 2005: 1) e-government, e-justice 2) philosophy and sociology of cyberspace 3) psychology and internet 4) law in cyberspace 5) crime and security in cyberspace 6) regulatory framework of electronic communications. [↑Read all] The conference will take place 7 to 8 November 2005 in Brno, Czech Republic. … Continue reading

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cyber syllabi

So, you never knew where to find the courses on the really hot topics—Aaron Delwiche maintains a list of ↑ Games-related Syllabi on the Web, and a list of ↑ Courses in Cyberculture. Especially ↑ Claudia A. Engel‘s course on “Virtual Communities: Online Technologies and Ethnographic Practice” suits my interests: “Traditionally the fieldwork of cultural anthropologists has been based on face-to-face interaction with informants from an oftentimes local community. As modern communication technologies and the Internet are spreading this course invites you to explore ethnographic methods and the field of cultural studies from a new perspective: How can an ethnographic … Continue reading

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digital genres

“The ↑ DGI [Digital Genres Initiative] is a loosely organized network of fellow-thinking intellectuals, academics, and computer geeks. The goal of the DGI is to spur debate and thinking about the way that digital technology allows us to think and communicate with one another. The DGI is dedicated to the idea that some of the best thinking about new digital technologies comes from the people who make and use them even as academics and intellectuals provide a unique and valuable perspective. The DGI is committed to creating a space where the academy and the internet can cross-polinate. The DGI is … Continue reading

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call for papers: cyberanthropology

The new website of the GAA conference 2005 now is online, and the German abstract of my workshop ‘cyberanthropology’ can be viewed there. Please understand the German and the English abstract as a call for papers. Proposals must not exceed 1500 characters and have to be sent to me by e-mail: Alexander.Knorr [at] vka.fak12.uni-muenchen.de before 15 June 2005. Proposals can be in either English or German language—presentations at the workshop can also be in English or German, but must not exceed 20 minutes. The workshop is tentatively scheduled on Thursday, 06 October 2005, 13.45-15.45 and 16.00-18.00. … Continue reading

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bedford’s metamorphosis

hotbeds of creativity — the appropriation of the truck in Sudan Gabriel Kläger has produced a substantial update to his website Africars, a subpage of the website of the Institute for Sociocultural Anthropology, Munich. As I still am a tremendously generous and forthcoming webmaster, I immediately set the update online. Kläger transformed Prof. Kurt Beck‘s article “Bedfords Metamorphose” (Beck 2004) into html, ‘hyper-augmented’ with a load of exclusive, illustrative and commented photographies, stemming from Beck’s recent fieldwork in Sudan. The pictures document the technological process of appropriation and make the latter comprehensible. Since ‘globalization’ and ‘glocalization’ became issues in anthropology, … Continue reading

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thick description of personal weblogging practice

David Brake, PhD-student (Media and Communications) at the LSE (not the Stock Exchange, but the London School of Economics and Political Science, where Malinowski was appointed to the first Chair in Social Anthropology in 1927), plans ethnographic research on blogging: “This study will provide a “thick” qualitative description (Geertz 1975) of personal weblogging practice in a particular context – that of authors from across England, purposively sampled to provide demographic variety, who have created their sites using either LiveJournal or Blogger’s software. [What about those who use geek-style software like blosxom? ;-] This description will be based on semi-structured interviews … Continue reading

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california digital library

“Harnessing technology and innovation, and leveraging the intellectual and cultural resources of the University of California, the California Digital Library supports the assembly and creative use of the world’s scholarship and knowledge for the UC libraries and the communities they serve. Established in 1997 as a UC library, the CDL has become one of the largest digital libraries in the world.” Searching for “Anthropology” delivered 61 anthropology-books online for free. via cyberanthropology … Continue reading

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videogamestudies

cultural difference on intercultural persistent state worlds Alan Meades, a Masters-degree (Electronic Arts) student at Middlesex University (UK) does post-graduate research in cyberanthropology: “This study aims to verify if players originating from geographically and culturally different backgrounds exhibit different game preferences, and therefore behaviour within Massively Multiplayer Online games. This study focuses specifically on Square-Enix’s Final Fantasy XI because of the design of the server infrastructure, and the resultant feature that each server is shared with people from many cultures and nations. […]“ On his website Alan hosts an according online-survey, both in English and Japanese language! When I hit … Continue reading

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