machinima: finding its way

  Coincidence again—just last Monday, while composing ↵demo and ↵snaking and strafe-jumping, I found ↑“Diary of a Camper”, not this blog’s subtitle, but allegedly the very first instance of ↵machinima. Today I found ↑Machinima: Finding Its Way, representing “not only a somewhat loose retrospective of Machinima’s history, but also the blurry lines between fandom, subversive fetish and grotesque commercialism”:  Machinima is a hybrid medium, a mix and remix of filmmaking and game culture. Its life started in 1996 as an afterthought—a nearly overlooked existence within the gaming community, then known as “Quake Movies.” In the last ten years however, Machinima … Continue reading

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free spirit

Still I am deep down into the consumption of cyberpunk—literature and movies. Yesterday I rewatched Terry Gilliam’s “Brazil” and this afternoon “Immortal” by Enki Bilal. At 8 P.M. I watched the news and afterwards zapped through the channels a bit. Suddenly “Immortal” was on the screen again. Confusion at my side, then I realized that it indeed was on TV. D’oh—just yesteday I have bought the DVD. Anyway. And I have gone back to the habit of reading several books in parallel fashion. After having watched “Minority Report” some days ago I am now reading Philip K. Dick’s short story … Continue reading

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symbols

In gamedesign and -modding it is a cherished practice to integrate references to other popular- and/or cyberculture items. Especially hidden references, so-called easter-eggs, have developed their very own dynamic. But not only gamers “creatively re-fashion the resources of popular culture for their own expressive discourse purposes.” (↵Wright, Boria & Breidenbach 2002) I guess it is a practice to be found within every discipline of artistic expression falling into the domains of scifi, cyberpunk and their kin.  The dominant and constantly reappearing graphical design within Kurt Wimmer’s movie ↵“Equilibrium” (2002) is the Tetragrammaton ‘logo’. It’s prominently displayed on walls, flags, imprinted … Continue reading

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on target

  After ↵collecting toilets and ↵more toilets, now it’s the other way round—not toilets in computergames, but computergames in toilets. Designer ↑Marcel Neundörfer has developed urinals with integrated gameplay: “Recessed into a urinal is a pressure-sensitive display screen. When the guest uses it, he triggers an interactive game, producing images and sound.” To make things clear: you actually have to well-aimedly pee on the touch-sensitive screen. A gender-sensitive topic? And what about combining Neundörfer’s gadget with ↵shocking roulette? Unthought-of business opportunities. But there will be copyright issues, as Hayes Solos Raffle and Dan Maynes-Aminzade had the idea already in 2002 … Continue reading

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