neuromancer tattoo

In a way this is a kind of follow-up to ↵moore’s magic. Somewhen [yes, that’s a word—still] during 2007 and 2008 ↑Nigel Palmer of Brighton has tattooed portions of text from William Gibson’s ‘Neuromancer’ (1984) on ↑the_dan’s arms. The association with Peter Greenaway’s ‘The pillow book’ (1996) is obvious. GREENAWAY, PETER. 1996. The pillow book [motion picture]. Rotterdam: Kasander & Wigman Productions. GIBSON, WILLIAM FORD. 1984. Neuromancer. New York: Penguin. via email from CT—tnx! … Continue reading

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larry cuba

Just dug that one up from my bookmarks—back in the 1970s ↑Larry Cuba, then at the ↑Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL), made the computer graphics seen during the endbattle against the Deathstar in the original ‘Star Wars’ (Lucas 1977).     When I first saw those animated 3D line-graphics in the cinema in ’77 I was fascinated.     Three years later, at the first computer-christmas, I got a ↑Commodore 64 (C64).     With a freely programmable computer at my hands I set out to recreate those graphics. For a start I was content with the idea of an anmation … Continue reading

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computerspielemuseum

Of course you can accuse me and my consorts to be computergame-aficionados, but the importance of computergames, not only for culture and society, but for technology and economy as well, meanwhile is ↑percepted more ↑and more. Hence it is a shame that computergames still are somewhat underrepresented museum- and exhibitionwise. Stanford’s ↑Henry Lowood has ↑aptly put it: ‘Since the late 20th century, cultural history includes digital game culture. It is not only the case that the history of this medium will be lost if we do not preserve the history of digital games, but also that we will not be … Continue reading

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cccp

cosmic communist constructions photographed Until recently I never was aware that the cyberpunkish movie ‘Rollerball’ (Jewison 1975) was mainly shot in my city, but Wikipedia wisened me up: ‘Among the filming locations used was the Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle as arena, the then-new BMW Headquarters and Museum buildings in Munich, Germany, appearing as the headquarter buildings of Energy Corporation and the Olympiapark, Munich.’ Fittingly enough the latter today is the base for Munich’s Parkour-practitioners. Back in the early ’70s all those buildings were brand new and deemed to be futuristic—in a strange way they still are today. And that is the link to … Continue reading

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tripods

Polish illustrator and graphics designer Robert ‘TroC‘ Czarnyr (his website is a treasure trove for everybody seriously interested in 3D-visualization) has done two illustrations for H. G. Wells’ classic ‘The War of the Worlds’ (1898), which to my eye perfectly catch the atmosphere and ambience of the original text. You can judge for yourself, as the high resolution versions at Renderosity are accompanied with the matching excerpts from the novel: Thunder Child attacking Martian tripod war machines [Hi-Res] and Martian tripod war machines attacking London [Hi-Res]. WELLS, HERBERT GEORGE. 1898. The War of the Worlds. London: William Heinemann. via entry … Continue reading

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industrial tribal art

It is a common cliché that anthropologists are fascinated by masks, even obsessed sometimes. Hence it was high time to post something on masks in here. If the two above pictured specimen from Steve ‘Radio-Guy’ Erenberg‘s collection seem vaguely familiar to you, then read Steve’s fine article at ‘Collectors Weekly’ to hear about an astounding theory. About the origin of his collection Steve says: More than 30 years ago, my wife, Helene, and I started collecting. She loved tribal masks—African, Oceanic, Indonesian, etc.—while I focused on medical, scientific, and industrial artifacts.     I’ve spent my career as a creative … Continue reading

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stim-u-lax

Back in April this year we one night spotted the above pictured device in a Stuttgart shop window, of which we couldn’t make neither heads nor tails—of the device, not of the shop window, the latter was clear as glass. It wasn’t long before midnight, naturally the shop was closed and hence we couldn’t ask what the thing was. So we took a row of pictures and decided to track the thing down, which isn’t an easy matter if you have absolutely no clue about what it could be.     Well, some days ago we were watching ‘M*A*S*H,’ season … Continue reading

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eldredge reloaded

  With the video Jeffrey “cwtrain” Eldredge uploaded to YouTube yesterday, the story of the inverse tie-knots finally seems to have come to an end. In the video Jeffrey demonstrates exactly ↵the sequence I had come up with on 19 October 2008. This knotting-sequence I had christened ‘Eldredge Variant,’ because all I did was adding two through-the-loop moves to Jeffrey’s original sequence, thereby making it into a knot. Since then I regularly wear the knot in public and even made inverse tie-knots the core topic of my Habilitationsvortrag ‘↑There is no Merovingian! Tie-knots, Neo-Dandyism and Cyberculture,’ presented on 03 February … Continue reading

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eldredge variant

To my eyes ↵the ‘Eldredge’ is an absolute beauty, but the solution Jeffrey Eldredge chose for the final move does not exactly leave us with a ‘knot’ in the technical sense of the term. He simply tucks what is left of the narrow end of the tie away under the collar and the loop the tie forms around the neck. That way we depend on the pressure the loop around the neck exerts on the collar for the whole structure not to come apart. To improve this situation I added two ‘through-the-loop’ movements to Jeffrey’s invention. Translated to Fink-Mao notation, … Continue reading

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