gamic

Believe it or not—there is not yet an entry for it at Wikipedia: ↑gamic [pronounced. game-ick] is a combination of the words ‘game’ and ‘comic’, meaning a graphic novel based on screenshots made ‘inside’ a computergame. Gamic is the ‘still-side’ of ↑machinima. One could say that gamic has the same relation to machinima as graphic novels have to animated cartoons. As gamic and machinima are no formally defined genre-concepts, but contemporary ‘native cyberculture concepts’ the boundaries are bleeding. Sometimes gamics are seen as a sub-genre of machinima, and there are true borderline cases ↵like the MP2-based “↑The White Room“, to … Continue reading

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zeiss ikon eyes

A discussion-thread at ↑williamgibsonboard, broaching the issue of the ↑actual looks of synthetical eyes within ↑Gibson‘s ↑sprawl trilogy inspired the man himself to write a blog-entry on ↑Molly’s mirrorshades and Zeiss-Ikon eyes. The entry is particularly interesting in respect to precision of description and “the hyperspecificity of the cyberpunk style”. Then Gibson finally comes to the “Zeiss-Ikon eyes”: With the “Zeiss-Ikon eyes”, from “Burning Chrome” [↵Gibson 1987 [1982]], which some readers evidently invision as (gack) German camera lenses, there was a “really”. I assumed they were vat-grown, genetically optically perfect organs, perhaps further tweaked to maximize them as, in effect, … Continue reading

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wondermark hair gel

  The ↑webcomic above is copyrighted by ↑David Malki ! and to be found at ↑wondermark.com … “Although he is an experienced artist and graphic designer, David does not draw the figures in Wondermark; rather, they are culled from a variety of 19th-century primary sources courtesy of the Rare Books Dept. at the Los Angeles Central Library, as well as his own ever-growing collection.”  via entry at boingboing … Continue reading

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africa

  Anthropology is very much concerned with the representation not only of its findings, but with what it looks upon: cultures. The whole Writing-Culture debate and everything in its wake revolves around this. It triggered new experimental means of mediating anthropological knowledge up to ethnographic fiction or even poetry. “Anthropological knowledge” itself has been challenged, and still is. Then there is visual anthropology, occupied with media decidedly different from the written text: images, the moving image, ethnographic film. Finally the so-called ‘new media’ came into focus, too—the digital, computer-driven media with their interactive potential, able to generate and support decidedly … Continue reading

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tron 2.0

  For some early cyberculture items the franchise- and adaptation-roundabout seems to spin forever. The 1982 silverscreen-movie ↑Tron was followed by Bally Midway’s ↑identically named arcade game in the same year. 1983 saw the computergame ↑Discs of Tron, and, more recently, in 2004, ↑Tron 2.0 and its ports/spinoffs ↑Tron 2.0 Killer App. A comic book series based on Tron 2.0 was cancelled due to licensing issues with Disney. But now Slave Labor Graphics (↑SLG) ↑seems to pull it through:  TRON by Landry Walker, Eric Jones and Louie De Martinis This new comic series continues where the TRON 2.0 video game … Continue reading

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fun

After last year’s excellent Rules of play (↵Salen & Zimmerman 2004) now everybody recommends:  KOSTER, RAPH. 2005. A theory of fun for game design. Scottsdale, Arizona: Paraglyph Press.  For background information see the according ↑entry at game matters with extensive comments, and ↑Conversation with Raph Koster by Celia Pearce. And if we’re talking about ‘definitive’ books on computergames, here’s a hint: Chris Crawford’s classic ↑The art of computer game design is online already since 1997. Just to round it up, the ludologist ↑points to ↑The evolution of gaming: computers, consoles, and arcade, another take on game history. And then, academics … Continue reading

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aggressive morning fever

↑BURKE, TIMOTHY AND KEVIN BURKE. 1999. Saturday morning fever: Growing up with cartoon culture. New York: St. Martin’s.  GOLDSTEIN, JEFFREY. 2001. ↑Does playing violent video games cause aggressive behavior?. Chicago: University of Chicago. Electronic Document. Available online: http://culturalpolicy.uchicago.edu/conf2001/papers/goldstein.html … Continue reading

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otaku, doujinshi, and gamemodding

↑Mizuko Ito [↵keitai-scholar and sister of blogosphere-legend ↑Joi Ito] introduces us to ↑Otaku Media Literacy—if one would replace ‘anime otaku’ by ‘gamemodders’ and add one or two adjustments, her text still would be ‘the truth’. Here’s an excerpt: ↑[…] Overseas anime otaku—fans of Japanese anime—represent an emergent form of media literacy that, though still marginal, is becoming increasingly pervasive among a rising generation. Anime otaku are media connoisseurs, activist prosumers who seek out esoteric content from a far away land and organize their social lives around viewing, interpreting, and remixing these media works. Otaku translate and subtitle all major anime … Continue reading

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