payne & redemption

  After ↑Max Payne Hero there now is another Max-Payne fan film in the making, called ↑Payne & Redemption. Fergle Gibson, writer and director of the upcoming movie said to ↑Deep Six:  Payne & Redemption is Part III of a series of collective shorts surrounding an original foreboding tale of love, betrayal, vengeance… and a whole lotta painkillers. The story focuses on the development of Max Payne’s character, exploring his psyche and what drives his incessant behaviour towards pursuing what’s most important to him—Justice. However, I guarantee, for those of you who couldn’t give a flying f*** about all that … Continue reading

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technology underground

  ↑GURSTELLE, WILLIAM. 2006. ↑Adventures from the technology underground: Catapults, pulsejets, rail guns, flamethrowers, Tesla coils, air cannons, and the garage warriors who love them . New York: ↑Clarkson Potter.  The technology underground is a thriving, humming, and often literally scintillating subculture of amateur inventors and scientific envelope-pushers who dream up, design, and build machines that whoosh, rumble, fly—and occasionally hurl pumpkins across enormous distances. In the process they astonish us with what is possible when human imagination and ingenuity meet nature’s forces and materials. William Gurstelle spent two years exploring the most fascinating outposts of this world of wonders: … Continue reading

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engaging anthropology

↑ERIKSEN, THOMAS HYLLAND. 2006. ↑Engaging anthropology: The case for a public presence. Oxford: ↑Berg.  Anthropology ought to have changed the world. What went wrong? Engaging Anthropology takes an unflinching look at why the discipline has not gained the popularity and respect it deserves in the twenty-first century. From identity to multicultural society, new technologies to work, globalization to marginalization, anthropology has a vital contribution to make. While showcasing the intellectual power of discipline, Eriksen takes the anthropological community to task for its unwillingness to engage more proactively with the media in a wide range of current debates, from immigrant issues … Continue reading

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half real

  ↑Jesper Juul, ↑the ludologist, has published his book ↑half-real—here’s the ↑about:  A video game is half-real: we play by real rules while imagining a fictional world. We win or lose the game in the real world but we slay a dragon (for example) only in the world of the game. In this thought-provoking study, Jesper Juul examines the constantly evolving tension between rules and fiction in video games. Discussing games from Pong to The Legend of Zelda, from chess to Grand Theft Auto, he shows how video games are both a departure from and a development of traditional non-electronic … Continue reading

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chinese gold farms

The New York Times’ David Barboza has written an article on chinese gold farms, called ↑Boring Game? Hire a player which is available online via the International Herald Tribune:  FUZHOU, China One of China’s newest factories operates here in the basement of an old warehouse. Posters of World of Warcraft and Magic Land hang above a corps of young people with drowsy eyes glued to their computer screens, pounding away at their keyboards in the latest hustle for money. The people working at this clandestine locale are called “gold farmers.” Every day, in 12-hour shifts, they kill monsters and harvest … Continue reading

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boom: headshot!

After having given an impression of a decidedly ↑etic perspective on professional gaming (↵world’s greatests), here are instances of the ↑emic perspective of pro-gamers onto themselves and their culture. The ↑pure pwnage ↑series of auto-ethnographical/biographical movies allows unique insights into the 1337-culture of pro-gaming. In front of the background of the recent ↵progressive developments in game-design, especially the midget portraits of FPS-Doug are uniquely enlightening what really is behind gaming culture. From Episode 3: ↑Meet FPS Doug, from Episode 5: ↑FPS Doug CS:S. Download the ↑complete episodes (links to multiple mirrors there). initially via e-mail from ↑KerLeone—tnx again … Continue reading

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visualcomplexity

  Graphical visualization of data is definitely ↵something I am fond of. For aesthetical reasons, but for pragmatic ones, too—sometimes. Anyway, ↑visualcomplexity is a great resource:  VisualComplexity.com intends to be a unified resource space for anyone interested in the visualization of complex networks. The project’s main goal is to leverage a critical understanding of different visualization methods, across a series of disciplines, as diverse as Biology, Social Networks or the World Wide Web. I truly hope this space can inspire, motivate and enlighten any person doing research on this field. ↑[…] via entry at knowledging across life’s curriculum … Continue reading

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stacker

↑the Onion ↑carries a story on recent—very recent—development inside the gaming industry \o/ NEW YORK—Electronic-entertainment giant Take-Two Interactive, parent company of Grand Theft Auto series creator Rockstar Games, released Stacker Tuesday, a first-person vertical-crate-arranger guaranteed not to influence young people’s behavior in any way.     “With Stacker, the player interacts with an environment full of boxes—lightweight, uniformly brown boxes with rounded corners—and uses diligence and repetitive hard work to complete his mission,” said Doug Benzies, Stacker‘s chief developer. “We’re confident that the new ‘reluctantly interactive’ content engine we designed will prevent any excitement or emotional involvement, inappropriate or otherwise, … Continue reading

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